Nashville Zoo

Two Clouded Leopards Born at Nashville Zoo

Nashville Zoo is thrilled to announce the birth of a male and female clouded leopard on June 30.

The cubs weighed in at about half a pound and measured around 4 inches in length at birth which is much larger than the average cub. Nashville Zoo now has 16 clouded leopards in their care. In total, Nashville Zoo has celebrated the birth of 42 clouded leopards since 2009. These are the first cubs to be raised at the Zoo since 2019.

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Critically Endangered Cotton-Top Tamarin Born at Nashville Zoo

[June 7, 2022] - Nashville Zoo is excited to announce the birth of a cotton-top tamarin monkey. The baby was born on May 29 to 8-year-old Caqueta (mom) and 17-year-old Pancho (dad) and the sex has yet to be determined. This species is among the most endangered primates in the world so each birth in human care is crucial to the survival of the species.

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A United States (And ZooBorns!) Breeding First!

On April 29, Nashville Zoo welcomed the very first spotted fanaloka to be born in the United States. The male pup is being hand-reared by the Zoo's veterinary staff and is alert and healthy.

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He was born to a pair of fanaloka that recently arrived at the Zoo and are being cared for in an area away from public view. The three fanaloka, including the baby, are the only known members of its species that live at an AZA facility in the US. Nashville Zoo is working to breed and conserve them in an effort to bring attention to this lesser-known species.

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First Mexican Spider Monkey Birth at Nashville Zoo

[April 18, 2022] - Nashville Zoo is excited to announce the first successful Mexican spider monkey birth at the Zoo. The monkey was born on April 9 to Molly (mom) and Sandy (dad) bringing the total number of spider monkeys in the Zoo's care to five. The baby and mom are healthy and made their exhibit debut last Thursday.

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"Molly has been a great mom so far. She is calm, nurturing and gives the baby plenty of time to nurse," said Nashville Zoo's Primate Supervisor Brittany Canfield. "Each member occasionally gets to groom the baby too."

MORE PHOTOS BELOW THE FOLD!

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Caracal Kittens Are Growing Up Fast!

While Nashville Zoo Caracal kitten River and Ember left January 10 to go to the Chattanooga Zoo, two new caracal kittens were born the same week to adult caracals living in a behind-the-scenes area of the Zoo. The kittens are being hand-reared by the Zoo's veterinary and carnivore teams for eventual close-up experiences with zoo visitors. This makes 12 caracals to be born here at the Zoo!

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You can catch these two on a webcam at the Zoo's Website: https://www.nashvillezoo.org/baby-boom

LOTS MORE CUTE PHOTOS BELOW THE FOLD!

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My How They've Grown! 3-Month-Old Caracals are stars of a live feed at Nashville Zoo

River and Ember are the names of two caracal kittens born in October to adult caracals living in a behind-the-scenes area of the Nashville Zoo. The kittens, whose mother was not able to care for them, are being hand-reared by the Zoo's veterinary and carnivore teams for eventual close-up experiences with zoo visitors.

Caracal Kitten November - 2021- Bailey Kelly (6)

The three-month-old kittens are still living in a neonatal care room at the Zoo's Veterinary Center.

Guests can see the newborns daily on a live camera feed. Find a link to the feed below.

https://www.nashvillezoo.org/baby-boom


Bottle-fed Baby Binturong at Nashville Zoo

Born the 1st of October, a Palawan Binturong kit, now just over 2 weeks old, is visible in the window of Nashville Zoo’s Veterinary Center.

The reason the kit is being bottle-fed is that it’s mom couldn’t produce enough milk.

Binturongs are large nocturnal mammals native to the forests of Southeast Asia.

Binturongs are sometimes called bearcats, even though they are not related to bears or cats.


Four Furry Featurettes — Cheetah, Tapir, Leopard & Civet Babies

 
Vinnie the Banded Palm Civet
 
Vinnie the Banded Palm Civet was born to a pair of civets living behind the scenes at the Zoo and is just about a month old. Nashville Zoo’s veterinary team is hand-rearing Vinnie. The hope for Vinnie is that he will become an ambassador animal. Civets are nocturnal so Vinnie spends the majority of his day napping. He will be hand-reared until he is fully weaned, and the vet team estimates that it will be in about a month. Full-grown Civets can weigh around 6 pounds. You can come see Vinnie in the window of the neonatal room at Nashville Zoo's HCA Healthcare Veterinary Center.
 
Amur Leopard Cub
 
On August 6th at 4:05 am, the Santa Barbara Zoo’s Amur leopard, Ajax, gave birth to her first cub, and the two are doing well and currently bonding behind the scenes. The cub is a female and has been given the name Marta by her Premier Foster Feeder sponsors, Marta Holsman Babson and Henrietta Holsman Fore. The cub weighed in at 517 gms (1.1 lbs) at its first medical examination on August 6.
This is the first Amur leopard birth at the Santa Barbara Zoo in more than 20 years. Ajax is the most genetically valuable female Amur leopard in North America currently, so this first cub from her will contribute valuable genetics to the population in human care. Amur leopards are the most endangered of all the big cats, with less than 100 remaining in the wild, and the Zoo has been attempting to breed the species for several years now as part of the conservation efforts for this species. This is the fourth litter for Kasha, who arrived at the Zoo in March 2020, just prior to the first coronavirus closure. The pairing of Ajax and Kasha was recommended by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) as part of the Amur Leopard Species Survival Plan (SSP), a program to maintain genetic diversity of threatened and endangered species in human care.
Animal care staff at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) are hand-raising a male cheetah cub for several weeks before placing the cub with a foster cheetah mother at another zoo. The cub was one of a litter of three born to 7-year-old female Sukiri Sept. 16; the other two cubs were stillborn. Keepers report the cub is strong, active, vocal and eating well. The Cheetah Cub Cam is offline as the cub is no longer in the den.
While Sukiri nursed the surviving cub overnight, providing critical warmth, colostrum and hydration, she started to ignore the cub the morning of Sept. 17. She did not appear agitated when the cub was removed by keepers from her yard later that day and continues to behave and eat normally. Sukiri ate the two stillborn cubs, which is not unusual for a carnivore and in line with wild female cheetah behavior as a dead cub invites predators.
Animal care staff are staying around the clock to feed the cub every 2 to 3 1/2 hours in SCBI’s veterinary hospital. The cub is being fed a formula used successfully to hand-raise cheetah cubs at other zoos. In the coming weeks, a female cheetah at another AZA-accredited zoo is set to give birth. At the recommendation of the SSP, this cub will be introduced to that litter pending any other developments.
SCBI spearheads research programs in Virginia, the Zoo in Washington, D.C., and at field research stations and training sites worldwide. SCBI scientists tackle some of today’s most complex conservation challenges by applying and sharing what they learn about animal behavior and reproduction, ecology, genetics, migration and conservation sustainability.
 
Tapir Calf
 
On Thursday 19th August, Linton Zoo’s female Tapir Tiana gave birth to a healthy female calf after a normal 13-month gestation. We are pleased to say that Mum, Dad and new baby, as yet un-named, are all doing well.
The Brazilian tapir is a large heavily built mammal of a strange prehistoric appearance. The tapir is in fact so well adapted to its environment that it has remained unchanged for about 30 million years. It lives deep in the Brazilian rainforest where, because of the destruction of its habitat and illegal hunting it is has already become extinct in part of its range. The tapir is a shy creature taking to water when threatened where it is able to stay submerged for hours using its long nose to snorkel until such time it feels it is safe to surface. They feed on roots and vegetation but never strip a bush bare of its leaves, zigzagging their way through the undergrowth, conserving the habitat.
Although tapir have survived for millions of years, living in harmony with nature, their future in the wild is by no means secure. A European breeding programme will provide a safeguard against extinction for these wonderful creatures.