Gibbon

Checking In With Baby Lolani

Akron Zoo white-cheeked gibbon baby, Lolani, is growing leaps and bounds! She recently turned 4 months old and is starting to explore more and be a little adventurous. Parker, being the good mom that she is, is letting Lolani learn on her own while keeping an eye on her.

Lolani is hitting her milestones right on time, if not early! She has starting eating solid food and soon she'll get to venture outside once the weather warms up consistently. You can visit Lolani and her parents, Parker and Milo, daily!


Akron Zoo To Hold Naming Contest For White-Cheeked Gibbon Infant

AKRON, Ohio – The Akron Zoo is holding a naming contest for its new white-cheeked gibbon infant. The contest, presented by Akron Children’s Hospital, runs Wednesday, Jan. 12 – Wednesday, Jan. 26. The public can vote on a name at akronzoo.org/naming-contest.

The five names are gender-neutral as the sex of the baby is unknown at this time. Gibbon infants cling to their mothers for the first few months, and zoo staff is hands-off with the baby. The names choices are Lolani, Keo, Kanoa, Rou and Jinzi.

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White-cheeked Gibbon Birth At Akron Zoo

Parker the Gibbon gave birth at Ohio’s Akron Zoo on Thursday, Dec. 9 at around 9 p.m. White-cheeked gibbons are arboreal, which means that they live high in trees. Gibbons are more likely to give birth high up, and Parker is protecting her baby from the beginning as she catches the infant during the delivery. She immediately begins grooming and cleaning the baby.

Parker is a very attentive and caring mother. She nurses and cuddles her infant while dad, Milo, watches from afar. Parker is very protective of her baby and does not let Milo get too close. Gibbon fathers do play a role in rearing, so this is temporary for our gibbon family!

Parker has established strong bonds with her care team since she arrived here at the Akron Zoo at the end of 2020. While our staff is hands-off with the baby, Parker is willing to show the baby to her keepers and our veterinary staff, who can then take a look at the baby to make sure everything is going well.

After a few days, Parker allows Milo to sit next to her and meet the baby for the first time. He gently reaches out to touch the infant and after begins to groom Parker.

For primate species, grooming is a good indicator of a strong bond. Parker and Milo are often seen grooming each other. When the baby is one week old, Milo grooms the infant for the first time!

Gibbon babies will hold on to their mom from the time of birth. At two days old, Parker brings the baby to show members of her care team while Parker enjoys some food.

Sound on for this video! While Parker is eating, the baby is finding his or her voice and vocalizing before beginning to nurse!   

Parker was very excited to show off her baby during their first time in the indoor gibbon habitat.


A Birth That’s Worth Its Weight In Gold!

On September 29, an infant white-cheeked gibbon was born at Poland’s Zoo Wroclaw. The baby is the child of Xian and Carusa and is believed to be a male. The population of white-cheeked gibbons in the wild is declining at an alarming pace. Only 150-160 individuals have been counted in nature. Zoos are becoming their only chance for their survival. Carusa and Xian are the only pair of white-cheeked gibbons in Poland. Just over 200 in zoos around the world have them in care.


Port Lympne Welcomes Javan Gibbon Baby

On the 12th January 2021, Port Lympne welcomed a newborn male Javan Gibbon!

Port Lympne has rewilded 7 Javan gibbons from Port Lympne and their sister park, Howletts.

Aspinall Foundation is the world’s most successful breeder of Javan gibbons with more than 50 births so far at Port Lympne and Howletts.

Javan gibbons live in the rain forest regions of Java, which is an island in Indonesia.

Like all gibbons, Javan gibbons have very long forelimbs, long fingers and shorter thumbs which make them great brachiators. That means they swing between branches in trees.

Javan Gibbons have a fluffy appearance because of their very dense and long silvery-grey fur.

Family groups are made up of a male and female and up to three juvenile offspring.


Endangered Gibbon Born at Assiniboine Park Zoo

1_Assiniboine Park Zoo  gibbon baby born February 4  2019

The Assiniboine Park Zoo is thrilled to announce the birth of a White-handed Gibbon on February 4.

This is the first offspring for mom, Maya, and dad, Samson, who were matched on a recommendation from the Association of Zoos and Aquariums Species Survival Plan Program and selected to be the first residents of the Zoo’s new Gibbon habitat, which opened in June 2017.

“Maya and Samson appeared to be a really good match right from the start, and we have been looking forward to this possibility for some time, so this is very exciting news for our staff, volunteers and visitors,” said Grant Furniss, Sr. Director, Zoological Operations.

For the past week, the Gibbon family has been enjoying privacy in an off-exhibit holding area where the animal care team can discreetly monitor them to ensure that both mom and baby are doing well. Maya is proving to be an attentive mother and the baby is doing well, so the Gibbons have now been given access to their indoor habitat, which is currently closed to visitors.

The baby’s sex is not yet known, as staff are currently taking a “hands off” approach and will only intervene and examine the baby if necessary.

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4_Assiniboine Park Zoo  White-Handed Gibbons  Maya and SamsonPhoto Credits: Assiniboine Park Zoo

White-handed Gibbons (Hylobates lar) are small tailless apes with soft, thick fur that can vary from black to a pale fawn colour. They live in trees and are among the fastest of all primates, using their very long arms to swing effortlessly among the branches.

They are currently classified as “Endangered” by the IUCN, due to habitat loss and hunting. They are found mainly in tropical rainforests in Southeast Asia, where palm oil production is on the rise. Palm oil is found in many food products, cosmetics, soaps, candles, and even fuel. Visitors to the Zoo can learn what they can do to bring change to the palm oil industry by supporting companies that use traceable, sustainable palm oil.

The Assiniboine Park Zoo has a very successful history with breeding Gibbons. Maya was born at the Assiniboine Park Zoo in January 2011. Her parents, Mel and Manju, both lived in Winnipeg before being transferred to Safari Niagara in 2011 when the former monkey house was decommissioned. Samson’s father, Chan, was also born at Assiniboine Park Zoo in 1992 and lived here for two years, before moving to Edmonton.


Chester Zoo's Top 10 Baby Animals of 2018

Conservationists at Chester Zoo have celebrated an unprecedented number of births in 2018, including some of the world’s rarest and most at-risk species.

1. Precious sun bear cub Kyra is first of her kind to be born in the UK (8)

Sun Bear

Adorable cub Kyra was the first Sun Bear to be born in the UK. Her birth was caught on the zoo’s CCTV cameras and people around the globe watched Kyra’s first moments with her mom. Kyra’s parents, Milli and Toni, were both rescued from poachers in Cambodia.    

Conservationists estimate that less than 1,000 Sun Bears remain in the wild across Southeast Asia. Deforestation and commercial hunting for their body parts have decimated their numbers.

2. Baby Stevie is the arrival of the decade… for Chester’s chimpanzees  (3)

Chimpanzee

Critically endangered Western Chimpanzee Stevie was the first of her kind to be born at Chester Zoo in nearly 10 years.

Stevie’s birth followed a scientific project, spanning several years, which carefully assessed the genetics of all Chimpanzees in zoos across Europe. The study confirmed that the troop of Chimps at Chester Zoo is the highly-threatened West African subspecies – one of the rarest in the world – establishing them as a critically important breeding population. It is estimated that as few as 18,000 West African Chimpanzees now remain in the wild.

3. Elephant calf Anjan astonishes scientists after being born three months after expected due date (2)

Asian Elephant

After an unusually long pregnancy believed to have lasted 25 months, Asian Elephant Thi Hi Way gave birth to a healthy male calf, who keepers named Anjan.

A major Chester Zoo project in Assam, northern India, has successfully found ways to eliminate conflict between local communities and the nearby Asian Elephant population, offering a blueprint for the future conservation of the species.

4. Greater one-horned rhino calf Akeno gives new hope to species (2)

Greater One-horned Rhino

The momentous birth of Greater One-horned Rhino calf Akeno, born to mom Asha, was captured on CCTV cameras at the zoo.

Keepers watched as Asha delivered her calf safely onto to soft bedding after a 16-month-long gestation and 20-minute labor.

At one stage, the Greater One-horned Rhino was hunted almost to extinction and less than 200 survived in the wild. Thankfully, steps to protect the Rhinos were taken just in time and today there are around 3,500 in India and Nepal.

5. Secretive okapi calf Semuliki is a star in stripes (2)

Okapi

A rare Okapi calf named Semuliki arrived to first-time parents K’tusha and Stomp. The Okapi is found only deep in the forests of the Democratic Republic of Congo and its highly secretive nature contributed to it being completely unknown to science until 1901.

Despite being a national symbol and protected under Congolese law, Okapi populations declined in the wild by nearly 50% over the past two decades and the species is now listed as endangered by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

6. Tiny forest dragons help uncover new information about the species (4)
Bell’s Anglehead Lizards

A clutch of rare baby  Bell’s Anglehead Lizards – also known as Borneo Forest Dragons – hatched at the zoo, helping conservationists uncover more about the species’ breeding patterns, life cycle and habits.

The Lizards’ wild south Asian habitat however, is being decimated to make way for unsustainable palm oil plantations – a threat which is pushing many species in the region to the very edge of existence.

7. Rare silvery gibbon adds to record baby boom at the zoo  (2)
Silvery Gibbon

The birth of a tiny Silvery Gibbon astonished visitors to the zoo who were able to admire the infant just minutes after its birth. 

Conservationists hailed the arrival of this highly endangered primate, with just 4,000 of its kind now remaining on the island of Java, Indonesia, where the species is now listed as endangered by the IUCN.

8. Fluffy flamingo chicks are pretty in pink  (2)

Flamingos

Keepers were tickled pink by the arrival of 21 Flamingo chicks. Each of the fluffy newcomers was carefully hand fed by the zoo’s bird experts four times a day for five weeks until they were developed enough to fully feed for themselves.

Flamingo chicks are white or grey in color when they first hatch, resembling little balls of cotton wool, and begin to develop their famous pink plumage at around six months old.

9. Tiny babirusa triplets arrive in zoo ‘first’ (3)

Babirusa

The first set of Babirusa triplets were born at the zoo, a huge boost to the species which has experienced a recent population crash on the island of Sulawesi, Indonesia.

Once considered fairly common, the rapid decline comes as result of hunting for their meat and habitat loss, which has seen Babirusas disappear from many parts of the island.

10. Black rhino birth a surprise to visitors  (5)

Eastern Black Rhino

The arrival of Jumaane, a rare Eastern Black Rhino calf, left a handful of lucky zoo visitors in shock as his birth took place right in front of them.

Conservationists now estimate that fewer than 650 Eastern Black Rhino remain across Africa – a staggeringly low number driven by an increase in poaching to meet demand for rhino horn, which supplies the traditional Asian medicine market.

The birth of Jumaane is another vital boost to the Europe-wide breeding program which is crucial for the conservation of this critically endangered species.


Chester Zoo Shares Photos of One-Day-Old Baby Gibbon

1. Baby silvery gibbon (5)

A rare baby Gibbon is the latest addition to the “biggest baby boom of mammals” on record at Chester Zoo.

The Silvery Gibbon – one of the world’s most threatened primates – was born to mom Tilu, age 10, and 19-year-old dad Alven on October 10 after a gestation of around 210 days.

The tiny, pink-faced primate is much too small to be sexed and therefore has not yet been named.

1. Baby silvery gibbon (6)
1. Baby silvery gibbon (6)Photo Credit: Chester Zoo



Gibbons are built for life in the trees and use their extra-long arms to swing from branch to branch, a technique called brachiation. As mom travels in the treetops, her baby clings tightly to her chest using its long fingers.

As the baby matures, it will begin to venture away from mom for brief periods. Like most Apes, Gibbons grow relatively slowly and depend on their mothers for a long period. Females give birth approximately once every three years. Silvery Gibbons are uncommon in zoos.

Silvery Gibbons, also known as Javan Gibbons, are found only on the Indonesian island of Java. These Apes are restricted to mountainous areas with dense forest cover. Though habitat loss is an issue on heavily-populated Java, the areas where Gibbons are found are very remote and rugged, so Gibbon populations have stabilized. Nonetheless, Silvery Gibbons are listed as Endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Fewer than 5,000 individuals remain in more than 15 locations on the island. Only about half of the Gibbons live in protected areas.  

See more photos of the baby Gibbon below.

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Critically Endangered Gibbon Born at Zoo Wroclaw

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Zoo Wroclaw is excited to announce the birth of a Northern White-cheeked Gibbon. The baby arrived on June 28th, and the sex is not yet known.

Zoo Wrocław is now home to a total of three Northern White-cheeked Gibbons. The infant’s parents both arrived in October 2013. The first one to make their home at the Zoo was 9-year-old dad, Xian. He was born in Apeldorn, NL, and was sent to Wrocław via the zoo in Pilsen, Czech Republic. A week later, Xian was joined by female, Carusa. She was born in 2006 at the Osnabrück Zoo, Germany. The pair’s first offspring, a male called Dao, was born on October 17, 2014.

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4_2017-06-29 (81)Photo Credits: Zoo Wroclaw 

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