Zebra

Marwell Zoo Welcomes Another Zebra Foal

1_JB_Marwell_HartmansZ_22-10-2018_004

A Hartmann’s Mountain Zebra has been born at Marwell Zoo in Hampshire, UK.

The first time mother, Dorotka, who is genetically very important to the European population, gave birth to the foal in the early hours of October 21.

Keepers say six-year-old Dorotka is looking after her yet-to-be-named foal very well and they can be spotted together in their paddock behind the Amur leopard enclosure.

After tragically losing a foal in 2014, the last successful breeding of this vulnerable species at the zoo was in August 1997, so the new foal is very special and increases the Hartmann’s Mountain Zebra group at the zoo to four.

 

2_JB_Marwell_HartmansZ_22-10-2018_005

3_JB_Marwell_HartmansZ_22-10-2018_006

4_JB_Marwell_HartmansZ_22-10-2018_001Photo Credits: Marwell Zoo

Marwell manages the International Studbook and the European Ex situ Programme (EEP) for the Hartmann’s Mountain Zebra, which are mainly found in Namibia, but also Angola and South Africa.

Tanya Langenhorst, Conservation Biologist at Marwell Wildlife, who is the international studbook and EEP coordinator for the species, said, “Our latest arrival is a much welcome addition as it has been a long stretch at Marwell without Hartmann’s Zebra foals. Dorotka came to us from Zoo Usti in the Czech Republic and is genetically very important. This foal is her first and it’s great to see them both doing so well.”

Continue reading "Marwell Zoo Welcomes Another Zebra Foal" »


Marwell Zoo Welcomes Grevy’s Zebra Foal

1_Zoo Photographer - Credit Jason Brown - Grevys foal (6)

An endangered Grevy's Zebra has been born at Marwell Zoo in Hampshire, UK.

First-time mother, Imogen, gave birth to the female foal in the early hours of October 12 at the Wild Explorers exhibit.

Keepers say both mother and the yet-to-be-named foal are doing very well. The latest arrival takes the total number of Grevy’s Zebra at the zoo to eight and is the first foal to be sired by resident stallion, Fonzy.

Ian Goodwin, Animal Collection Manager for Hoofstock, said, “Imogen is looking after her foal very well. It’s great to watch her exploring her new surroundings at Wild Explorers, where we highlight the conservation work we carry out in Africa.”

“Our new arrival is a very important and welcome addition to the endangered species breeding programme.”

2_Zoo Photographer - Credit Jason Brown - Grevys foal (17)

3_Zoo Photographer - Credit Jason Brown - Grevys foal (11)

4_Zoo Photographer - Credit Jason Brown - Grevys foal (12)Photo Credits: Jason Brown

In the late 1970s, there were 15,000 Grevy’s Zebra in the wild. Today there are estimated to be around 2,800 remaining.

The Grevy’s Zebra has suffered one of the most drastic population declines of any African mammal due to climate change, habitat loss and competition with increasing livestock numbers.

Ian added, “Since 2003, Marwell Wildlife has been working with partners in northern Kenya to conserve Grevy's Zebra. We employ a team of conservation biologists and scouts who work in the field and they have been instrumental in helping to create a national conservation strategy for the species.”

According to Ian, Marwell also manages the International Studbook and the European Ex situ Programme (EEP) for Grevy’s Zebra.

4_Zoo Photographer - Credit Jason Brown - Grevys foal (2)


Zebra Foal Has Eventful First Day on Earth

1_BIOPARC Valencia - septiembre 2018 - nacimiento cebra en la Sabana (15)

On the afternoon of September 5, visitors of BIOPARC Valencia were fortunate enough to witness the birth of a Zebra foal.

Amazingly, just a few minutes after the birth, that moment of joy was replaced by one of anguish when the newborn colt accidentally fell into the small body of water in the Zebra exhibit. Keepers quickly entered the water and saved the baby. The newborn was delivered to the anxious mother, while the crowd of zoo patrons responded with applause.

2_BIOPARC Valencia - septiembre 2018

3_BIOPARC Valencia - septiembre 2018

4_BIOPARC Valencia - septiembre 2018Photo Credits: BIOPARC Valencia 

The new foal and mom, La Niña, are doing well. Keepers report that the little Zebra instinctively follows his protective mother.

La Niña arrived at BIOPARC Valencia in 2007 from the Halle Zoo (Germany) and the new colt’s father, Zambé, was transferred from Safari de Peaugres (France) in 2012.

5_BIOPARC Valencia - septiembre 2018

6_BIOPARC Valencia - septiembre 2018


Summer Baby Boom at San Diego Zoo Safari Park

1_BabiesGOHRhino_003_LG

There’s been a late summer baby boom at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, eliciting lots of “oohs and aahs” from visitors of all ages.

Among the new baby animals that can be seen at the Park, there’s a Greater One-horned Rhino calf, named Tio, who was born on July 9 to mom, Tanaya.

Also, a male Giraffe calf, named Kumi, was born August 6, and a handsome male African Elephant was born August 12 and has been named Umzula-zuli.

A young Scimitar Horned Oryx can be seen sticking close to his mom at the Park, and a one-month-old Grevy’s Zebra foal enjoys sunning with mom.

San Diego Safari Park visitors may see the baby animals and all the Safari Park has to offer from an African Tram Safari, a Caravan Safari or private Cart Safari.

2_BabiesGiraffe_001_LG

3_BabiesEle_008_LG

4_BabiesOryx_007_LGPhoto Credits: Ken Bohn/ San Diego Zoo Global

Since 1969, more than 37,600 animals have been born at the Safari Park, including 23,000 mammals, 12,800 birds, 1,500 amphibians and 40 reptiles. The Safari Park’s successful breeding programs help conserve numerous species, many of which are threatened or endangered, like the Scimitar Horned Oryx.

Continue reading "Summer Baby Boom at San Diego Zoo Safari Park" »


Lucky Zebra Born on Friday the 13th

1_Zebra foal 2018 Cotswold Wildlife Park (photo credit Jackie Thomas) (1a)

Keepers at Cotswold Wildlife Park are thankful for a fortunate event that occurred on a traditionally unlucky day-- Friday the 13th! They discovered that their Chapman’s Zebra mare, Stella, had given birth to a foal. This is her fourth baby with stallion, SpongeBob, and it is the breeding pairs’ first female foal.

Keepers enlisted the help of fans and supporters to select a name for the energetic new filly, and the name ‘Luna’ was chosen!

Curator of Cotswold Wildlife Park, Jamie Craig, commented, “For once, Friday the 13th proved very lucky. The foal was up and about very quickly and despite a distinct lack of coordination, was soon dashing around the paddock. Luckily for her, she was able to enjoy the benefits of a rare hot British summer and continues to go from strength to strength.”

Visitors to the Park can now see the youngster in the Zebra enclosure, opposite the Rhino paddock.

2_Zebra foal 2018 Cotswold Wildlife Park (photo credit Jackie Thomas) (2c)

3_Zebra foal 2018 Cotswold Wildlife Park (photo credit Jackie Thomas) (9)

4_Zebra foal 2018 Cotswold Wildlife Park (photo credit Jackie Thomas) (10)Photo Credits: Jackie Thomas/Cotswold Wildlife Park

Cotswold Wildlife Park has been home to these iconic African animals since 1976. Their first Chapman’s Zebra (Equus quagga chapmani) arrived at the Burford collection in 1978, eight years after the Park first opened to the public on Good Friday, 27th March 1970. This latest arrival marks the forty-fifth Chapman’s Zebra birth - a testament to the Park’s successful breeding programme.

The gestation period for a Zebra is approximately twelve months. Females give birth to a single foal. Soon after birth, they are able to stand up and walk. During the first few weeks of life, the mother is very protective. The foal recognizes its mother by her call, her scent and her stripe pattern. The mare’s protectiveness ensures that the foal will not imprint on another animal. The mare will suckle her foal throughout and beyond his first year and their bond is an incredibly strong one.

Zebras are the only wild horses that remain plentiful in their natural range in the African plains. They are related to the now extinct Quagga (a cross between a Zebra and a horse) of which millions were killed, many simply for sport. Some were transported to zoos where breeding was thought unnecessary, as it was believed numbers weren’t a concern in the wild. Sadly, the last Quagga died in Amsterdam Zoo on 12th August 1883.

Continue reading "Lucky Zebra Born on Friday the 13th " »


Bioparc Valencia Welcomes First Zebra of the Season

Cebras - madre y potro nacido 10 julio - verano 2018 - BIOPARC Valencia

BIOPARC Valencia recently welcomed their first Zebra foal of the year!

The new mother, Bom, arrived at BIOPARC Valencia in 2007 from the Copenhagen Zoo in Denmark, and the father, Zambé, was transferred from Safari de Peaugres in France in 2012.

Keepers report that the new family is doing very well, and the foal constantly follows his mother, who protects and feeds on demand, enjoying the warm summer days with the rest of the herd. Predictably, the Zoo says other females in their herd of Grant’s Zebra are currently pregnant and could give birth soon.

Cebras en la Sabana - madre y potro nacido 10 julio - verano 2018 - BIOPARC Valencia

Cebra nacida 10 julio - verano 2018 - BIOPARC ValenciaPhoto Credits: BIOPARC Valencia

This new Zebra birth adds to those that in previous years have occurred in BIOPARC, which makes it a genetic reserve of this emblematic African species.

The geographical distribution of the Grant's Zebra (Equus burchelli boehmi) is in Zambia, west of the Luangwa River, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, northern Tanzania, Uganda, Kenya, Ethiopia and Somalia. They are the smallest of six subspecies of the Plains Zebra.

Their diet includes grass, hard stems and, sometimes, leaves or bark of trees and shrubs. They require a large amount of food so it is not uncommon for them to spend around 20 hours a day grazing.

The gestation period is 360-370 days and usually one calf is born. Life expectancy is around 38-40 years.


Endangered Zebra Foals Frolic at Zoo Miami

1_5

On February 3rd, two endangered Grévy's Zebras were born at Zoo Miami!

The male and female foals were born after a gestation period of approximately 13 months. The female weighed in at a robust 115 pounds, while the male weighed a very healthy 110 pounds!

The mother of the female foal is 7-years-old and arrived at Zoo Miami from Zoo New England. The mother of the male is a 6-year-old that came from the Henry Doorly Zoo in Omaha, Nebraska. The father of both foals is an 18-year-old that formerly resided at White Oak Conservation Center in Northern Florida.  

After receiving a neonatal exam and having private time to bond with their mothers, both foals are now out on exhibit. The newborns have been exploring, running, and bucking throughout their exhibit: displaying their instinctive ability to move quickly, shortly after birth. This is the 21st and 22nd successful birth of this endangered species at Zoo Miami.

2_6

3_1

4_2Photo Credits: Ron Magill / Zoo Miami

The Grévy's Zebra (Equus grevyi), also known as the Imperial Zebra, is the largest living wild equid and the largest and most threatened of the three species of zebra. Named after Jules Grévy, it is the sole extant member of the subgenus Dolichohippus. The Grévy's Zebra is found in Kenya and Ethiopia.

In addition to their larger size, they are distinguished from the other species of zebras by their large head and ears, along with their very thin stripes, which do not extend to the belly. They are found in very arid regions, in herds that can number from less than a dozen individuals to over 100. In captivity they can live to 20 years, but in the wild their lifespan is likely much less. They are listed as “Endangered” by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.

More great pics below the fold!

Continue reading "Endangered Zebra Foals Frolic at Zoo Miami" »


Zebra Foals ‘Horsing Around’ at ZSL Whipsnade Zoo

1_Grevys Zebra foal Sept17 cZSL 2 (5)

Two endangered Grevy’s Zebra foals were born this September at ZSL Whipsnade Zoo.

Female foal, Katie, was born to first-time mum Nafisa on September 10 and seemed delighted when a playmate joined her nine days later. Male foal, Kito, was born to mum Henna on September 19, and the two youngsters began tearing around their enclosure, much to the amusement of keepers and visitors.

2_Katie and mum Nafisa (2) cZSL

3_Katie and mum Nafisa  cZSL

4_Katie and mum Nafisa (1) cZSLPhoto Credits: ZSL (Zoological Society of London)

Team Leader, Mark Holden said, “Like all zebras, when Katie and Kito were born they just seemed to be all ears and legs. It wasn’t long before they were bounding around together, running and jumping around at a huge pace, before eventually running out of steam and returning to their respective mums.”

“It’s all typical behaviour for young zebra foals, as they learn what their legs are for, then going back to mum for comfort. Katie and Kito are settling in really well, interacting with the rest of the group of Grevy’s Zebras here at the Zoo and exploring their surroundings.”

Grevy’s Zebras are classified as “Endangered” on the IUCN Red List, and there are thought to be only around 2,600 Grevy’s Zebras left in the wild.

Mark Holden continued, “We’re very privileged at ZSL Whipsnade Zoo to have successfully bred this beautiful but endangered species for 29 years. Kito is our 36th Grevy’s Zebra foal born here as part of the European Endangered Species Programme.”

The Grevy’s Zebra (Equus grevyi) has much narrower stripes than the other two zebras species, and it can live on grasses, which are too tough for cattle to eat or digest. Originally from Northern Kenya and Ethiopia, a whole herd can be seen at ZSL Whipsnade Zoo. They are successfully bred at ZSL Whipsnade Zoo as part of the European Endangered Species Programme (EEP).

The EEP is a tool used by zoos, aquariums and wildlife parks across Europe to manage conservation breeding programmes. Each species is managed by a studbook, and the studbook holder is responsible for pairing well-matched animals and recording details such as birthplace and parentage to ensure a healthy and diverse population of animals.

5_Katie the Grevy's foal cZSL


Zebra Foal Takes First Steps at Fort Worth Zoo

Zebra4

On August 25, the Fort Worth Zoo welcomed a male Grant’s Zebra foal to the herd – the first to be born there since 1996!

The foal was born to first-time mom Roxie, and both mom and baby are doing well. He was up and walking shortly after his birth and soon learned to maneuver on his long, wobbly legs.

Zebra2
Zebra3Photo Credit: Fort Worth Zoo



At birth, the soon-to-be named foal weighed 60 to 70 pounds and stood roughly 30 inches tall.  When fully grown, he will weigh 650 to 750 pounds and measure about 44 inches tall at the shoulder.

The Fort Worth Zoo houses Grant’s Zebras, which are the smallest of the six subspecies of Plains Zebra. Native to Africa’s savannahs, Zebras feature a striking black-and-white-striped coat. Although the black and white lines on a Zebra’s coat are easy for human eyes to spot, it is difficult for Zebras’ predators, such as Lions, to differentiate individual Zebras in a herd. Plus, when a Zebra is standing in tall grass, it can be surprisingly difficult to see. Like human fingerprints, each Zebra's stripe pattern is unique.

Grant’s Zebras feed on grasses and move about in large herds, often mingling with Wildebeest. They are listed as Near Threatened by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List.  Grant's Zebras are the most numerous of all Zebra species or subspecies, but recent wars in their home countries have caused drastic declines in the population.

 


Zoo Basel’s Zebra Filly Plays With Purpose

1_za_170117_02

A female Grant’s Zebra, named Niara, was born at Zoo Basel on December 16. Her name means ‘one with high purpose’, and this lively little girl can be found out-and-about, with purpose, in the Africa Enclosure.

This little mare is the first offspring for mom, Jua (age 5). Initially, the inexperienced mother was unsure of little Niara stretching her head under her mother’s stomach from the side to nurse. Hunger made Niara creative, and she eventually was successful in her attempts by reaching from the back.

Niara’s father, Tibor (age 7), is also a member of the Zoo’s herd. The Zebra herd also includes the foal’s grandmother Chambura (12), Lazima (3), and little Nyati (1/2).

Niara will soon be getting to know the little Ostriches, who share her herd’s exhibit. The Ostriches and Zebras are currently making alternate use of the Africa Enclosure, as Zebras are very inquisitive and like to play at hunting the smaller birds.

2_za_170117_01

3_za_170117_05

4_za_170117_03Photo Credits: Zoo Basel

The Zebras at Zoo Basel have become acclimated to the wintery temperatures and are not really bothered by the current cold weather. Heated stalls are currently available for animals that do not cope well with the cold.

Continue reading "Zoo Basel’s Zebra Filly Plays With Purpose" »