Polar Bear

New Footage Of Adorable One-month-old Polar Bear Cub At Highland Wildlife Park 

The Royal Zoological Society of Scotland has shared a video of a one-month-old polar bear cub at Highland Wildlife Park. 

New footage shared by the wildlife conservation charity shows the little one wriggling and rolling over before settling down for a sleep in the cubbing den with mum Victoria close by.  

Visitors will not be able to see the youngster yet as both mum and cub are settled in the off-show den to give them peace and quiet during the first sensitive few months.  

To find out more about visiting Highland Wildlife Park, please visit highlandwildlifepark.org.uk/we-are-open


Courtesy of RZSS


Polar Bear Cub Born At Highland Wildlife Park

On December 16th, The Royal Zoological Society of Scotland (RZSS) announced the birth of a tiny polar bear cub at Highland Wildlife Park, near Aviemore.  

Staff at the wildlife conservation charity were delighted when they first heard the distinct high-pitched cub sounds coming from the den earlier this week but say the coming months are crucial.  

CCTV footage captured in the den shows mum and cub enjoying a snooze.  

Victoria previously gave birth to Hamish, the UK’s first polar bear cub in 25 years, in December 2017. As part of the breeding programme for the species, Hamish moved to Yorkshire Wildlife Park in November 2020. Hamish’s father Arktos was paired with Victoria again earlier this year. 


Orphaned Grizzly Bear Becomes a Polar Bear Cub's BFF

An orphaned grizzly bear cub from Tok, Alaska has found sanctuary at the Detroit Zoo. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) received reports of a grizzly bear cub wandering alone near a neighborhood in June. Much too young to be separated from his mother, the ADF&G moved him to the Alaska Zoo in Anchorage for immediate care and a health assessment before he was transferred to the Detroit Zoo.

Jebbie-and-Laerke

Named Jebbie by the local residents who saw him and notified ADF&G, he arrived at the Detroit Zoo weighing 76 pounds, and today weighs 180 pounds. After a quarantine period and an exam by Detroit Zoological Society (DZS) veterinarians, Jebbie moved to the Arctic Ring of Life polar bear building, where he and the Detroit Zoo’s hand-reared polar bear cub, Laerke, have been gradually getting to know each other. Now, the two young bears wrestle, play with toys and spend their days together.

Polar bear cubs Astra and Laerke were born at the Detroit Zoo in November 2020 to 8-year-old mother Suka and 16-year-old father, Nuka. Two days after their births, Laerke appeared weak and stopped moving. She was brought to the Ruth Roby Glancy Animal Health Complex for around-the-clock emergency care.

“There are no other polar bear cubs who we can bring here to live with her, so we reached out to state agencies that frequently must find homes for orphaned grizzly bear cubs. We’re thrilled that we are able to give Jebbie sanctuary and provide a much-needed companion for Laerke,” said Scott Carter, chief life sciences officer for the DZS. “This social development is critically important for both Laerke and Jebbie.”

“Suka is a great mother and very protective of Laerke’s sister, Astra, but it’s clear that she no longer recognizes Laerke as her cub,” Carter added. “Returning Laerke to her mother and sister is not an option for us.”

Starting Thursday, September 23, visitors can see Laerke and Jebbie grow up together in the Arctic Ring of Life.

The Arctic Ring of Life is one of the largest zoo polar bear habitats in the world. It includes a grassy tundra, a freshwater pool, a “pack ice” area and a 190,000-gallon saltwater pool. This state-of-the-art facility encompasses more than 4 acres of outdoor and indoor habitats and was recognized by The Intrepid Traveler’s guide to “America’s Best Zoos” as one of the finest zoo habitats in America.


Two Polar Bear Cubs Born at the Detroit Zoo

Two polar bear cubs were born at the Detroit Zoo on November 17, 2020, to 8-year-old mother Suka, and 16-year-old father, Nuka. The cubs, who have not been named yet, are the first polar bears to be born and successfully raised at the Detroit Zoo since 2004.

The cubs were born in a specially-designed, private maternity den away from the other bears. It is equipped with infrared video cameras that allow staff to monitor the mother and cubs without disturbing them. On November 19, it was observed that one of the cubs was becoming inactive and appeared to be weak. The staff allowed Suka out of the den so that the weak cub could be retrieved.

Polar Bear Cub 4
Polar Bear Cub 4
Polar Bear Cub 4
Polar Bear Cub 4
Polar Bear Cub 4

The cub, a female, was taken to the Detroit Zoo’s Ruth Roby Glancy Animal Health Complex where she was examined by veterinarians and given fluids and formula. She has continued to receive around-the-clock care and bottle feeding.

Continue reading "Two Polar Bear Cubs Born at the Detroit Zoo" »


Tierpark Berlin’s Polar Bear Cub Has Big Day Out

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Tierpark Berlin’s Polar Bear cub ventured outdoors for the first time recently. Keepers watched with pride as the cub left the den with her mother, Tonja, and explored the outdoor exhibit for the very first time.

“Today is an extremely special day for the entire team here at Tierpark Berlin,” reported Tierpark Director, Dr. Andreas Knieriem. “After months of nervous waiting and crossing our fingers, I can hardly put the feeling of relief into words. We are delighted that visitors will finally get to see our little Polar Bear...”

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4_Eisbärin Tonja mit Nachwuchs_Tierpark Berlin 2019 (4)Photo Credits: Tierpark Berlin

The cub was born December 1, 2018 and spent the first three and a half months of her life with her mother, Tonja, in their maternity den. During that time, the helpless and tiny newborn grew into a strong and sturdy little bear.

“We are still extremely pleased with how the cub is developing,” said Polar Bear curator, Dr. Florian Sicks. “She has become so active and confident on her own four paws that it was clearly time for her to get outdoors.”

According to keepers, the cub has gained a lot of strength and confidence, so much so that during her second veterinary examination, she made it impossible for the team to weigh and measure her!

During her first introduction of the exhibit, the spritely young bear had hardly emerged from the den before she was off on a thorough exploration of her new surroundings. She clambered boldly over the rocks and even splashed around in the large pool.

“Young Polar Bears know instinctively how to swim as soon as they are big enough to leave the den with their mothers,” explained Sicks.

Protective mum Tonja never let her daughter out of her sight and was always standing by in case help was required.

According to the Zoo, Tonja and her cub will be spending time outdoors every day and will be on view to Tierpark visitors. Since outdoor adventures are rather tiring for small bears, the cub will still need to take regular rests with her mother in their den. The pair will therefore only be outside for a few hours at a time, especially in the early days.

The young Polar Bear is currently still yet-to-be-named, but Tierpark Berlin is in the process of deciding on the cub’s sponsor, which will then be involved in choosing a name. A decision on both the sponsor and the name is expected to be reached in early April.

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Polar Bear Cub Nibbles Toward New Milestone

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The Polar Bear cub, at Tierpark Berlin, is reaching toward another important milestone!

The female was born December 1, 2018 to parents, Tonja (age 9) and Volodya (age 7), and ZooBorns shared recent news of the cub’s first checkup in our feature: “Polar Bear Cub Brings ‘Girl Power’ to Tierpark Berlin”.

"The little Polar Bear is now interested in solid food and slowly nibbles meat pieces,” said Curator, Dr. Florian Sick. The new mom currently gets a daily portion of meat and a mix of carrots, lettuce and apples. Her new cub cannot miss the opportunity and occasionally manages to sample her mother’s meal. However, mother still regularly nurses the little bear.

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4_TonjaPhoto Credits: Tierpark Berlin

Zoo Director, Dr. Andreas Knieriem, is pleased with the good development of the cub. "We are very satisfied that the cub is quite cheeky and keeps her mother literally on the run around. Tonja always remains calm. She's just a really good Mama Bear."

By mid-March, the two will first go on a discovery tour of the grounds and will then be on exhibit for visitors to see.


Polar Bear Cub Brings ‘Girl Power’ to Tierpark Berlin

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During her first official veterinary exam, the Polar Bear cub at Tierpark Berlin demonstrated to staff that even a small bear has a lot of power!

New mother, Tonja, and her cub have spent their first eleven weeks tucked in cozy togetherness in the litter cave. The first vet exam not only determined the cub’s health, but the sex as well.

“The little Polar Bear is a cheery, strong girl. We were also able to convince ourselves personally of the development of the cub and are extremely satisfied,” shared Veterinarian/Zoo Director, Dr. Andreas Knieriem.

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4_Geschlechtbestimmung_Dr.Strauß_Dr. Knieriem_Tierpark Berlin_2019Photo Credits: Tierpark Berlin

Dr. Knieriem led the examination of the new cub, with the assistance of Dr. Günter Strauß and district manager Andrea Fleischer. After mom, Tonja, was lured with a warm soup of meat and carrots into the neighboring box, the vets were able to approach the youngster for the first time.

The female cub was also weighed, vaccinated, and treated for worms. With the three professional staff working together, the exam was over after about 15 minutes.

“The little Polar Bear, with a size of 61 cm from head to butt, proudly weighs 8.5 kg," explained Veterinarian, Dr. Günter Strauss.

Thanks to the extremely nutritious breast milk, with a fat content of about 30%, the cub’s size has increased rapidly in recent weeks. She currently nurses almost two hours a day, but the little bear has not dared to eat solid food.

According to Polar Bear Curator, Dr. Florian Sicks, zoo visitors will have to wait a bit to catch a glimpse of the new cub.

“Only when the little Polar Bear can safely follow mother, Tonja, will the two leave the nesting hole," Dr. Sicks explained. “This is expected to last until March.”

The cub was born December 1, 2018 to parents, Tonja (age 9) and Volodya (age 7). As in the wild, the father is not involved in the rearing of the cub.

The girl cub does not have a name yet, but Tierpark Berlin staff will announce plans for naming in the near future.