Giraffe

Brevard Zoo Welcomes Masai Giraffe Calf

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Brevard Zoo welcomed a newborn Masai Giraffe on October 19. The little one, a male, was born six feet tall and weighed 158 pounds.

The as-yet-unnamed calf arrived around 5:15 a.m., entering the world feet-first. He is the ninth offspring of 18-year-old mother, Johari, and the twelfth sired by 20-year-old Rafiki.

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3_181022012Photo Credits: Brevard Zoo

“The newborn Giraffe underwent a neonatal exam, where we checked his overall health,” said Michelle Smurl, the Zoo’s director of animal programs. “He looked to be in great condition at his checkup on Saturday.”

The calf will remain behind the scenes with Johari for a few weeks before making his first appearance in Expedition Africa.

Eight of the Zoo’s nine Giraffe belong to the Masai subspecies, which is native to Tanzania and southern Kenya. Habitat loss, poaching and civil unrest pose the most significant threats to Giraffe in their natural habitat.


Baby Giraffe At Virginia Zoo Gets Supportive Care

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The Virginia Zoo welcomed a male Masai Giraffe calf on October 13, 2018. This is the first baby for mom Noelle, who is five years old, and the sixth calf for dad Billy.

Noelle gave birth during the early morning hours in her indoor enclosure. Zoo keepers had been monitoring Noelle throughout her pregnancy, and in preparation for the calf’s impending birth, extra bedding was added to her stall to soften the calf’s delivery (Giraffes give birth standing up).

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Virginia Zoo Photo2
Virginia Zoo Photo2Photo Credit: Virginia Zoo

Within an hour or two of birth, most Giraffe calves can stand, walk, and nurse on their own. However, this calf got an unusually slow start, which caused concern among the staff. Though the calf did finally stand and walk a few hours after birth, he was not observed to nurse in the first 24 hours after his arrival. After Veterinary and Animal Care Staff assessed the situation and consulted with Giraffe experts at other zoos, they decided to temporarily separate mom and baby and begin supportive care, which included a regimen of antibiotics and intravenous fluids.

The calf’s neck was shaved to accommodate his medical procedures.  At birth, the calf weighed 123 pounds, and stands just under 6 feet tall. He has not yet been named.

Zoo staff have monitored the calf around the clock since his birth and continue to provide supportive care and supplemental feedings. They report that the calf appears to be gaining strength. He spends time with his mother each day so the two can bond and to encourage nursing.

“We’re hopeful that the calf will continue to respond to treatment,” said Greg Bockheim, Executive Director of the Virginia Zoo. “I’m confident our staff is providing the best care for the newborn and we’ll just have to be patient with the process.”

Masai Giraffes are one of four species and five subspecies of Giraffe found in Africa. Male Giraffes can grow up to 18 feet tall and weigh between 1,800 and 4,300 pounds. Females are between 13 and 15 feet tall and weigh between 1,200 and 2,600 pounds. Giraffes are listed as Vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

See more photos of the calf below.

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Kansas City Zoo Welcomes Second Giraffe Calf This Year

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Kansas City Zoo’s Masai Giraffe herd just got bigger! On Sunday, September 30, at 11:29 pm, six-year-old Makali gave birth to a male calf. The calf weighed 135 pounds and already stands 5 feet, 5 inches tall. A neonatal exam showed that the calf is in good health.

Right now, the calf is bonding with his mom behind the scenes, but fans can see him on the zoo’s Giraffe Cam.  He has not yet been named.

KCZoo Giraffe Calf Male 1Photo Credit: Kansas City Zoo

The new calf already has a playmate: female calf Dixie is eight months old and is sure to become fast friends with this youngster.

The calf’s father is nine-year-old Hamisi, the only male in the zoo’s herd. Hamisi has fathered several calves at his previous zoo and this is his second calf at the Kansas City Zoo. He also fathered Dixie.

Masai Giraffe are one of nine Giraffe species and subspecies found in Africa. Masai Giraffes live primarily in Kenya and Tanzania, and number around 32,000 individuals. The overall Giraffe population in Africa is decreasing due to growing human population pressure and illegal hunting. Giraffes are listed as Vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species.



Summer Baby Boom at San Diego Zoo Safari Park

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There’s been a late summer baby boom at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, eliciting lots of “oohs and aahs” from visitors of all ages.

Among the new baby animals that can be seen at the Park, there’s a Greater One-horned Rhino calf, named Tio, who was born on July 9 to mom, Tanaya.

Also, a male Giraffe calf, named Kumi, was born August 6, and a handsome male African Elephant was born August 12 and has been named Umzula-zuli.

A young Scimitar Horned Oryx can be seen sticking close to his mom at the Park, and a one-month-old Grevy’s Zebra foal enjoys sunning with mom.

San Diego Safari Park visitors may see the baby animals and all the Safari Park has to offer from an African Tram Safari, a Caravan Safari or private Cart Safari.

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4_BabiesOryx_007_LGPhoto Credits: Ken Bohn/ San Diego Zoo Global

Since 1969, more than 37,600 animals have been born at the Safari Park, including 23,000 mammals, 12,800 birds, 1,500 amphibians and 40 reptiles. The Safari Park’s successful breeding programs help conserve numerous species, many of which are threatened or endangered, like the Scimitar Horned Oryx.

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Phoenix Zoo Introduces Rafiki the Giraffe

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A baby Masai Giraffe at the Phoenix Zoo now has a name! The female calf was named Rafiki after nearly 16,000 people participated in an online naming poll.

Rafiki was born on June 26 to mom Imara and dad Miguu. Under Imara’s attentive care, the calf is healthy and strong. The name Rafiki is a Swahili word meaning ‘friend.’

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36763514_10156413769819707_3290074622388600832_nPhoto Credit: Phoenix Zoo

The staff is gradually introducing Rafiki to other members of the zoo’s Giraffe herd. For now, Rafiki and Imara spend most of their time behind the scenes in the Giraffe barn, but they’ll soon be moving onto the savanna habitat.

Seven-year-old Imara arrived at the Phoenix Zoo in 2012 as recommended by the Masai Giraffe Species Survival Plan to breed with nine-year-old male Miguu. He came to Phoenix in 2010 from the Los Angeles Zoo.

Masai Giraffes are one of four species and five subspecies of Giraffes, all found in Africa. Only about 100,000 individuals are estimated to remain in the wild across the continent. Habitat loss, which occurs as wild places are degraded or converted for human use, is the main factor influencing Giraffes’ decline. The species as a whole is listed as Vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List.

See more photos of Rafiki below!

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“For the Win!”- Tulsa Zoo Announces Giraffe Calf

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The Tulsa Zoo is proud of its latest addition, a Giraffe calf born on July 22. Mom, Lexi, and dad, Hekaya, welcomed the healthy male calf.

“The calf was active immediately, and within two hours stood and began nursing, all of which are excellent signs in such a short time period," says Zoological Curator-Mammals, Jordan Piha.

“The labor, birth and hours that followed were monitored by animal care and health staff”, Piha shared. “Keepers remained on-grounds overnight to monitor the new mother and calf, a standard practice with mammal births at the zoo.”

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3_IMG_3650Photo Credits: Associate Veterinarian Dr. Jen Kilburn, DVM / Tulsa Zoo

The Tulsa Zoo first announced the pregnancy on World Giraffe Day, June 21. At that time, the Zoo also announced completion of a million-dollar Giraffe barn renovation. The Osage Casino Hotel Giraffe Barn provides more than double the indoor space, improved facilities for staff to manage a multigenerational herd, and year-round viewing for guests.

The Tulsa Zoo temporarily closed access to the barn’s new public viewing area to give Lexi and her calf privacy for bonding. Hekaya and herd mate, Pili, a nine-year-old female, will be able to examine the new calf from the main yard. This temporary separation allows time for the calf to grow and learn to maneuver a smaller space before moving to the larger habitat with the adults, Piha says.

The young calf was recently given the name Ohe (pronounced o-He), which means, "to win". The Zoo also recently reported that their little “winner”, Ohe, is happily exploring his new world, letting the herd groom him through the fence line.

More great pics, below the fold!

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The Wilds Celebrates Birth Of Giraffe Calf

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The Wilds is proud to announce the birth of a male Masai Giraffe calf on July 10. Guests taking an Open-Air Safari Tour witnessed the birth in the open pasture at The Wilds, creating an unforgettable experience. So far, the calf appears strong and healthy, staying close to his mother. The Giraffe care team monitors mom and baby as they make their daily rounds.

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Giraffe Calf 7303 - Grahm S. Jones  Columbus Zoo and AquariumPhoto Credit: Grahm S. Jones/Columbus Zoo & Aquarium

The calf’s father, Raha, was born at the Los Angeles Zoo in April 2006, and the calf’s mother, Lulu, was born at Cincinnati Zoo in October 2012. This calf is Lulu’s first, and he was born after a gestation period of about 15 months. Like all Giraffe births, Lulu delivered her calf while standing up. Within a few hours of his birth, the calf stood, nursed, and began walking.

The breeding of Raha and Lulu was based on a recommendation from the Association of Zoos and Aquariums’ (AZA) Species Survival Plan® (SSP), a program designed to increase the genetic health and diversity of threatened and endangered species in human care.

“Welcoming a Giraffe calf to our herd is always an incredibly exciting time for our team,” said The Wilds Vice President Dr. Jan Ramer. “Not only is this birth a milestone here at The Wilds, but it also gives us great hope and a foothold to sustain declining populations of this species in their native ranges.”

Giraffes are listed as Vulnerable on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List, due to habitat degradation and poaching. In an effort to reduce threats to Giraffes, the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium and The Wilds support several conservation projects in Giraffe range countries across Africa, including the Serengeti Giraffe Project based in Tanzania, the Giraffe Research and Conservation Trust in Kenya, and the Giraffe Conservation Foundation in Namibia and Uganda.

Male Giraffes can grow to be 18 feet tall at their horn tips and weigh between 1,800 and 4,300 lbs. Females are 13 to 15 feet tall and weigh between 1,200 and 2,600 lbs. Giraffes are the tallest of all extant land-living animals and are the largest ruminants. Their native ranges are savannas, grasslands or open woodlands in central and southern African countries.

See more photos of the calf below.

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L.A. Zoo Welcomes Lovely Masai Giraffe Calf

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The Los Angeles Zoo is happy to announce the birth of a female Masai Giraffe calf!  Born on May 15 to mother, Hasina, and father, Phillip, the currently unnamed calf weighed in at 176 pounds and stood at around six feet tall.

This is the nine-year-old mother’s fourth calf and the six-year-old father’s third offspring. Hasina and Phillip were paired together through a Species Survival Plan (SSP) program that breeds Masai Giraffes in order to ensure the survival of a species that is threatened in the wild.

“She is one of the largest calves we’ve had born at the L.A. Zoo since I started working here in 2005,” said Mike Bona, animal keeper at the Los Angeles Zoo. “It is great timing that she was born before World Giraffe Day [June 21]. Not only does her birth help continue the Zoo’s efforts in its giraffe breeding program, but it also gives us an opportunity to educate guests on giraffe conservation and the current threats that the species faces in the wild.”

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4_Female Giraffe Calf Photo by Jamie Pham 3Photo Credits: Los Angeles Zoo/Jamie Pham

Giraffes are the tallest land mammal, and Masai Giraffes can grow up to 17 feet tall and weigh 2,700 pounds. The largest of the nine subspecies of giraffe, Masai Giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis tippelskirchii) are found in East Africa, namely southern Kenya and northern Tanzania. Giraffes are currently categorized as “Vulnerable” by the IUCN. Their populations are under threat and declining due to habitat loss and fragmentation, illegal hunting, and disease.

Guests to the L.A. Zoo can visit the calf and her giraffe herd during Zoo hours, weather permitting. When observing the calf bonding with the herd, be sure to check out the Zoo’s giraffe feedings. This interactive experience allows guests to get up close and personal with the adult Masai Giraffes while feeding them their favorite greens and learning fun facts about the herd from Zoo education staff.

*Giraffe feedings take place twice daily from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. and from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. and are $5 per person with paid Zoo admission. Tickets can be purchased (cash only) at the giraffe exhibit. Giraffe feedings are subject to weather-related changes, especially on rainy days.

More great pics, below the fold!

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200th Giraffe Calf Receives Special Care

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Cheyenne Mountain Zoo is caring for Penny, a Giraffe calf whose birth on June 4 marked the 200th Giraffe birth in the zoo’s history. Penny was found splayed the stall she shared with her mom, Muziki. Since then, the Zoo’s animal care and veterinary teams have been partnering to provide the best possible care to support the calf’s well-being.

“Splay” is a term used to describe when an animal’s legs go out from under them in an unnatural way. In Giraffe, splaying can result in moderate or even life-threatening damage to the hips and legs. The Zoo’s staff immediately assessed the condition of the calf and determined the most urgent medical need was to raise her blood sugar levels. When those levels were under control, Penny was reunited with Muziki to see if the calf would nurse and gain strength. When those nursing efforts were unsuccessful and the calf splayed again, the difficult decision was made to separate Penny from Muziki and begin hand-rearing protocols.

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Calf w mom 6.7.18 -  (2)Photo Credit: Cheyenne Mountain Zoo

Although Penny can walk on her own, staff helps the baby stand up and lay down, to prevent further injury. The extent of any injuries to her legs and hips is still being evaluated, and likely will be for some time. Penny has thus far been resistant to bottle feeding, so she is receiving tube feedings. Another attempt to have her nurse from mom had mixed results, with the calf nursing for a brief time, but ultimately splaying again.

The Zoo’s care teams are well-equipped to treat the calf, and Cheyenne Mountain Zoo has been recognized nationally for advances in veterinary medicine. However, the staff is not yet able to predict the outcome for Penny’s condition.



 


Cheyenne Mountain Zoo Celebrates 200th Giraffe

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Cheyenne Mountain Zoo is proud to announce the 200th successful Giraffe birth in the Colorado zoo’s history!

A female calf was born June 4 to a worldwide audience, as the birth was live streamed on YouTube and Facebook. The calf is the fifth offspring for 20-year-old mom, Muziki, and the fourth to be sired by dad, Khalid.

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4_CheyenneGiraffePhoto Credits: Cheyenne Mountain Zoo

The calf was born at 8:20 p.m. and tried to stand up shortly after birth, which is normal for Giraffe calves. When the calf still had not been able to stand at about 10:30 p.m., the Zoo’s animal care and veterinary teams decided it was time to lend a hand. They were able to separate the calf from mom, Muziki, long enough to give it a quick veterinary check and help it to its feet. This was also when staff discovered the calf is female. The Zoo’s care team estimated her at 5’ 8” tall and approximately 120 pounds.

After the calf was observed standing and walking on her own for a few minutes, Muziki was allowed back into the birth stall. Since then, mother and baby have been bonding well and keepers report seeing the natural behaviors they would hope to see.

Because Muziki was also born at Cheyenne Mountain Zoo, she has grown up in the culture of voluntary husbandry training that the Zoo is known for. This means that she voluntarily participates in her own health care, which fosters a strong trust relationship between keeper and animal.

Through this training, the Zoo was able to draw blood, confirming Muziki’s pregnancy early on. The Zoo was able to get limited ultrasound images of the calf during the pregnancy, with Muziki’s cooperation, and they were even able to bank some of Muziki’s plasma, in case the calf had need of it after the birth.

Cheyenne Mountain Zoo is not only a leader in the training and health of Giraffes in human care, but they are also making a huge difference in their conservation in the wild. Since January 2017, Cheyenne Mountain Zoo’s guests and members have contributed $97,000 through “Quarters for Conservation” contributions to help the Giraffe Conservation Foundation and its programs to save Giraffes in the wild. The Zoo has also provided staff to Uganda for several of those conservation efforts.

Cheyenne Mountain Zoo is home to the world’s most prolific captive Reticulated Giraffe herd, with 200 births at the Zoo since 1954. The new calf joins the Zoo’s existing herd, or tower, of 17 Giraffes, bringing the total to 18. Guests can get up close and hand-feed them on special indoor and outdoor elevated platforms anytime during the day, 365 days a year.

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