Takin

German Zoo Fans Are Taken With This Takin

Takin-Jungtier Paulina_Hellabrunn_2015_Marc Müller (5)
A Mishmi Takin calf at Hellabrunn Zoo is already displaying the skills required to be a Takin: climbing, fighting, and leaping onto rocks. 

Takin-Jungtier Paulina mit Mutter Kim_Hellabrunn_2015_Marc Müller (1)
Takin-Jungtier Paulina_Hellabrunn_2015_Marc Müller (3)
Takin-Jungtier Paulina_Hellabrunn_2015_Marc Müller (4)
Photo Credit:  Tierpark Hellabrunn/Marc Müller

Born on February 19, the calf, named Paulina, displays her amazing climbing skills by springing onto rocks more than twice her height. Adult Mishmi Takins can leap more than 12 feet.

Paulina was born to female Kim, who is nursing her calf and being a good mother.  The calf stood on her first try - an essential requirement for prey that need to run to survive.

Aside from mother’s milk, Paulina has nibbled on all the food that adult Takins like to eat, including carrots, hay, and pine needles. 

Both female and male Takins have distinctive short, stout horns that curve upwards from the center of the head. Signs of baby Paulina’s horn growth began to appear three days after birth. This makes the little calf look like a mini version of her mother, who is nicknamed "Sporty Kim" by her keepers because she is so energetic.

Paulina follows Kim's every move and tests the power of her little horns by annoying her father, Till, who takes everything in stride.

Mishmi Takins are native to southeast Tibet, China's southwest Yunnan province, northeast India, and northern Myanmar. Their stocky, muscular bodies and two-toed hooves are well-suited to their mountainous habitat.  Their thick, shaggy coats are covered by an oily substance secreted by the skin, which protects against the cold, damp air of the Himalayas.

See more photos of the Takin calf below.

Continue reading "German Zoo Fans Are Taken With This Takin" »


Meet Mesker Park Zoo's First Takin Calf

1 takin

Mesker Park Zoo & Botanic Garden in Indiana has welcomed its first-ever Takin calf, a female named Ching Lan, which means 'beautiful orchid' in Chinese. In the wild, this little calf would be following her mother on steep mountain paths at three days-old. It looks like she's practicing those motor skills by sneaking up on mom!

Born to first-time parents, the calf is thriving and zoo staff are very pleased with the attention her parents are giving her.

Zoo Director Amos Morris said, “The Takin are doing exactly what they need to be doing for their offspring and we are all enjoying watching wildlife at its best.”  

2 takin

3 takinPhoto credit: Mesker Park Zoo & Botanical Garden

There are four subspecies of Takin that live throughout the eastern Himalayas, in Tibet, some Chinese provinces, Bhutan, and northeast India. Once thought to be related to muskox, the Takin is now known to be more closely related to sheep.

In the wild, baby Takin begin to follow their mothers along steep paths when they are just three days old – a crucial survival skill for these leaf-eating animals that travel seasonally to find food. Though heavily-built, Takin are surprisingly agile on the rocky cliffs of their homeland.  Their large hooves have a spur that makes them sure-footed even on steep terrain.  Males can weigh up to 800 pounds. Both males and females have thick upward-turning horns.

Equipped for life at higher altitudes, they can withstand very cold temperatures. In winter, they grow a secondary coat as protection from freezing temperatures. Long nasal passages warm frigid air before it reaches the lungs. 

Because Takin live in remote areas, not much is known about their wild populations.  But habitat loss, hunting, and human disturbance have caused Takin to be listed as Vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.


Brand-new Baby Takin at Prague Zoo

10270518_10151988799482581_5678094541440029723_n
A rare Takin calf was born on May 6 at the Prague Zoo in the Czech Republic, and these photos show the baby just hours after its birth.1948040_10151988799492581_6453082175353355828_n

10302693_10151988799607581_5096871741179631267_n
10156016_10151988799562581_8454531164001903152_n
165928_10151988799477581_1534481335975659852_nPhoto Credit:  Tomáš Adamec, Zoo Praha

The male baby is genetically valuable to the European Takin breeding program because his grandfather was born in the wild.  Zoo Praha has exhibited Takin since 1998, when a small herd arrived from the Berlin Zoo.

Native to the eastern Himalayas, Takin are in the same family as goats and sheep.  Stocky and sure-footed, these goat-antelopes easily navigate high mountain terrain.They tavel in herds of 20-30 individuals, and graze on vegetation.

Takin are unqiue in that they secrete an oily, strong-smelling substance all over their entire body.  As adults, males Takin can weigh up to 770 pounds (350 kg).  Females are slightly smaller.

Due to overhunting and habitat destruction, Takin are listed as Vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.   


Los Angeles Zoo Welcomes a Takin Calf

1 takin

The Los Angeles Zoo and Botanical Gardens has announced the birth of a healthy Takin! She was born on February 12 and can now be seen on exhibit.

Related to sheep, Takin are a goat-antelope found in the eastern Himalayas. There are four different subspecies: the Sichuan or Tibetan Takin, the Mishmi Takin, the Shaanxi or Golden Takin, and the Bhutan Takin. The Takin is the national animal of Bhutan.

2 takin

3 takin

4 takinPhoto credit: Los Angeles Zoo and Botanical Gardens

Takin live in family groups of up to 30 individuals, and travel seasonally to feed on leaves and grasses at different elevations. They are found in grassy alpine zones as well as forested valleys. Threatened by overhunting and habitat loss and fragmentation, the species is classified as Vulnerable by the IUCN. 


Sichuan Takin Born at LA Zoo

1498765_10153842403880273_271498054_o

The Los Angeles Zoo and Botanical Gardens welcomed a female Sichuan Takin on February 12. Takin (pronounced “TAH-kin”), are stocky goat-antelopes native to China’s remote mountain forests.

1966169_10153842403920273_1583614677_o
1966033_10153842403910273_110844679_o
Photo Credit:  Los Angeles Zoo

In the wild, baby Takin begin to follow their mothers along steep paths when they are just three days old – a crucial survival skill for these leaf-eating animals.  Though heavily-built, Takin are surprisingly agile on the rocky cliffs of their homeland.  Their large hooves have a spur that makes them sure-footed even on steep terrain.  Males can weigh up to 800 pounds.  Both males and females have thick upward-turning horns.

Takin are well-suited to life in the cold.  In winter, they grow a secondary coat as protection from freezing temperatures.  Long nasal passages warm frigid air before it reaches the lungs. 

Because Takin live in remote areas, not much is known about their wild populations.  But habitat loss, hunting, and human disturbance have caused Takin to be listed as Vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.


Tiny Takin Twosome Named at Lincoln Park Zoo

Tak duo 1

Not just one, but two baby Sichuan Takins have been born at Chicago’s Lincoln Park Zoo, arriving on January 31 and February 9 respectively. Both are males. Just yesterday it was announced that the babies have been named Xing Fu, meaning happy good fortune, and Mengyao, meaning superior handsomeness! Last week Lincoln Park Zoo's animal care experts picked six Mandarin names to honor the species’ roots, and put them out for a public vote.

The species is native to China and surrounding mountain ranges, where they graze on shrubs and grasses. They’re Vulnerable in the wild, a consequence of hunting and habitat loss. Lincoln Park Zoo manages the species in partnership with other zoos through the Sichuan Takin Species Survival Plan (SSP)®, a shared conservation effort managed by the Zoo’s general curator, Dave Bernier.

Tak duo w mom

Tak solo

Tak fam
Photo Credit: Lincoln Park Zoo

The addition of these two babies brings the Zoo’s Sichuan Takin herd  to five animals, along with their father, Quanli, who arrived from Montgomery Zoo in 2011 as part of an SSP breeding recommendation, and both moms, Jinse and Mei Li, a first-time mom who was born at the zoo herself in 2007. The herd will be on exhibit in the Antelope & Zebra area from 10 a.m.–2 p.m. for the next couple weeks as they adjust to life with the little ones. 

Watch this video of the little ones leaping and pushing around a ball:


Takin Baby Arrives in the Early Morning at the San Diego Zoo

Takin#1

Visitors at the San Diego Zoo were in for a surprise this past Saturday when they were unexpectedly greeted by the zoo's newest inhabitant, a newborn Takin. The baby boy, born sometime between 7:30 and 8:00 AM on February 2nd, was quick to its feet as mother Summer immediately started work on cleaning her new son off. While this was not Summer's first child, it was the first for his father Lian. Summer's grown daughter Mei Long was also there to help her mother care for her new half brother. These photos, taken less than an hour and a half after the birth, document some the intimate first hours of this newborn's life.

TAKIN #2

Takin#3
Photo Credits: Rita Petita

Takins, closely related to the Sheep, are native to China and the eastern Himalayas. They have many specialized adaptations to cope with this cold environment such as a secondary coat of fur and a special nasal cavity that helps warm up the cold air they breath in. As herbivores, Takin eat essentially any vegetation that they come across including tough leaves, bark and bamboo. Although they are considered national treasures in their native China, Takin are still facing a declining population, primarily due to habitat loss. This has led to their classification as an endangered species by the IUCN. 

See more photos after the fold.

Continue reading "Takin Baby Arrives in the Early Morning at the San Diego Zoo" »


Meet Hobbit, Highland Wildlife Park's Newborn Takin

22

The Mishmi Takin herd at the UK's Highland Wildlife Park has welcomed a newborn male calf called Hobbit. Born early in July to doting mum Cava and indifferent dad Raci, this Mishmi Takin is the first calf to be reared in the Highland herd since 2010.  Hobbit by name, hobbit in size - this youngster is easy to spot due to the size difference between him and the adults and his 2 year old siblings. He also has a white band of hair across his forehead where his horns will eventually be. At just 20 days old, Hobbit is still staying quite close to mum Cava, but has more recently been exploring the enclosure solo. Amazingly takin calves can follow their mums just one day after birth over a whole host of different terrain.

Due to their size and muscular strength the only predators for these feisty animals are tigers, leopards and possibly bears, although they now find themselves under threat in the wild due to hunting for meat, the traditional medicine trade and habitat loss.

Douglas Richardson, animal collection manager at the Highland Wildlife Park, said, "Because of their size and slightly bizarre appearance, the takin are fairly popular with our visitors, in part because most people cannot quite figure out what they are. From a conservation perspective, the Mishmi takin is listed as Endangered and the European breeding program, which is managed by staff from the Highland Wildlife Park, may be of increasing importance given the pressures upon the wild population."

11

33
Photo Credit: Alex Riddell

Continue reading "Meet Hobbit, Highland Wildlife Park's Newborn Takin" »


Baby Takin Is King of the Hill at San Diego Zoo

Baby Takin is king of the hill at San Diego Zoo

A two-week-old Sichuan Takin climbs to the highest point in his exhibit on Wednesday. The kid, who was born on Dec. 28, 2010, was named Wûshi, which means 50 in Mandarin, because he is the 50th Takin to call the San Diego Zoo home. The first Sichuan Takin born outside of China was born at the San Diego Zoo in 1989. When Wûshi is not climbing rocks and tree stumps, he can be found head butting just about anything in his enclosure–including his grandmother, Bea.

Baby Takin San Diego Zoo giving a side smile

Baby Takin up close and personal at San Diego ZooPhoto credits: San Diego Zoo

Read and see more below the fold...

Continue reading "Baby Takin Is King of the Hill at San Diego Zoo" »