San Diego Zoo

Trinka the Wallaby Thrives After a Rocky Start


Trinka, an endangered Parma Wallaby joey, is being hand raised at the San Diego Zoo nursery. Her name is an Australian aboriginal word for daytime. She's small but strong, and her keepers describe her as sweet and expressive. She was found on the ground outside her mother's pouch when she was very small and had to be hand raised at the San Diego Zoo nursery. She was given a faux "pouch" to snuggle into and she comes out of it for a little exercise during the day. Feeding small babies like Trinka can be difficult, but the San Diego Zoo keepers are experts, and Trinka is doing great finishing off her four bottles a day.



Photo credits: Ken Bohn, San Diego

Meet Poco the Paca

Ken Bohn, San Diego Zoo Safari Park

This is the first time a Paca has been hand raised at the San Diego Zoo or the Safari Park. Keepers hope he will one day be an animal ambassador, who does education programs at the Safari Park. The affectionate rodent was born Sept. 7, 2011.

"He's getting bottles four times a day of formula that mimics his mom's milk," said Kim Millspaugh, a senior keeper.  "From Day 1 he also was eating solids and he enjoys almonds, figs, and green bell peppers. His favorite is oranges."

Guests can see the baby paca, which looks a bit like a spotted watermelon on short legs, in the nursery called the Animal Care Center.

Have You 'Herd'? Baby Elephant Makes Three at San Diego Zoo


Umngani is a mom again at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park. The African elephant gave birth to a male calf at 5:45 a.m. Monday, September 26, making her the first elephant in this herd to give birth to three calves.

Umngani, her 5-year-old daughter, Khosi, and her 2-year-old son, Ingadze, can be seen by Safari Park visitors as they watch over the newest member of the family, who is as yet unnamed. Khosi, whose nickname is “the babysitter,” is living up to her reputation, proving to be a wonderful big sister! She keeps a watchful eye on the calf, making sure he doesn’t stray far from their mother. Khosi also places her body between the newborn calf and the rest of the curious elephant herd.

Umngani and her three calves will continue to bond in the upper yard, separate from the rest of the herd, while the newborn gets steady on his feet, learns to follow his mother closely, and has at least a full day of nursing to make him strong. The Safari Park is now home to 18 elephants: 8 adults and 10 youngsters.The adults were rescued in 2003 from the Kingdom of Swaziland, where they faced being culled. 


Photo Credit: San Deigo Zoo

Bottle-feeding A Baby Silver Leaf Monkey

San Diego Zoo Silver Leaf Monkey 1

A one-week-old Silver Leaf monkey is benefiting from a little human care at the San Diego Zoo. The female named "Thai" was born on July 3 to a first-time mother. Unfortunately Thai's mother was not holding the newborn in a way that allowed her to nurse naturally, so animal care staff intervened and are bottle-feeding the baby several times each day. The small, orange monkey continues to spend time with her family between feedings so that social bonds remain strong.

San Diego Zoo Silver Leaf Monkey 5

San Diego Zoo Silver Leaf Monkey 2
Photo credits: Zoological Society of San Diego

More pictures beneath the fold...

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Gorilla Birth at San Diego Zoo

Kokamo, San Diego Zoo's  22-year old Western Gorilla, cradles her baby, who was born at 9 p.m. on June 17, 2011. It was determined that the infant was a male and he has been named Monroe! Monroe is the first gorilla born at the Safari Park since October 2000.

Both mother and baby are doing great and keepers report that the mother is taking excellent care of the baby, which is nursing often. The animal care staff report a very strong bond. A newborn gorilla grows quickly and can be expected to learn to walk on its own by six months; by 18 months of age, it can follow Mom on foot for short distances. Gorillas have been known to nurse for up to three years.

Monroe CU


Photo Credit: San Diego Zoo

The San Diego Zoo Safari Park now has 6 western gorillas, a species listed as critically endangered by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.Western gorillas live primarily with in tropical rain forests. A great deal of their habitat has been destroyed for roads and developments which have helped with the Gorillas decline in population. All gorillas are threatened due to poaching, hunting, habitat loss and many other reasons, most of them human induced.

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Update: How Does A Baby Hippo Play Under Water?


You may remember that a baby Hippo was born in late January 2011 at the San Diego Zoo, in front of about a hundred zoo guests. A crowd gathered during the mother’s two-hour labor to watch as mom Funani gave birth in the pool. At 11:30 a.m. You can read more about that and see the earlier Hippo baby pictures and video by CLICKING HERE.

The baby has been determined to be a male and was named Adhama. He is now 5 months old.



Photo Credit: Sand Diego Zoo

And exactly how does a baby hippo play under water?


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Bite-sized Bat-eared Fox Kits!


5 Bat-eared Fox kits were born to mother Singer & father Biko at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park on May 10th. The kits are currently on exhibit exhibit with the park's Warthogs in the Heart of Africa area. The Bat-eared fox is a small African fox known for its enormous ears, which are over 5 inches (13 centimeters) long. The ears are full of blood vessels that shed heat and help keep the fox cool; they also give the animal a very good sense of hearing.


Photo credits: San Diego Zoological Society

Tiger Cubs open Their Eyes for the First Time


Two tiny Malayan Tiger cubs opened their eyes last weekend at the San Diego Zoo. Born to mom, Mek Degong, the two week old cubs represent hope for a species that has been reduced to about 500 individuals from 3,000 in the 1800s. After this check-up, the cubs were returned to the birthing den, a cozy room filled with straw, where they will stay and nurse for the next two months.


San-Diego-Zoo-Malayan-Tiger-Cubs-2Photo credits: San Diego Zoo

Don't miss this outstanding video!


World's Largest Rodent Born at San Diego Zoo!


The San Diego Zoo welcomed a new Capybara on March 7. The baby was born to a first-time mother, Rose, and could be seen running around the exhibit just hours after it was born. Rose is taking great care of her offspring, which nurses several times a day. Animal care staff expects nursing to continue for another 15 weeks. In addition to nursing, the baby has already started eating solid foods, including broccoli and apple. Capybaras are born with incisor teeth and keepers have seen the baby chewing on branches and trees around the exhibit.

Photo credits: Ken Bohn

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