San Diego Zoo

It's a Boy! San Diego's Baby Panda Gets His Third Check-up

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Last week, San Diego Zoo examined its five-week-old baby Giant Panda for the third time. Veterinarians determined that the 3.2-pound cub is a boy! He's a bit lighter in weight than mother Bai Yun's previous five cubs, but this baby panda looks healthy with a belly girth of 12 inches, indicating he is eating well. The 13-inch-long cub gained 1 pound from his previous exam a week earlier. San Diego Zoo follows the Chinese cultural tradition of naming Giant Pandas after they are 100 days old. Stay tuned as San Diego Zoo will be announcing details on how the public can help name the new cub. The cub will remain in the den with his mother several months. Watch them live on the zoo's Panda Cam: www.sandiegozoo.org/pandacam.

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Photo credit: Ken Bohn / Zoological Society of San Diego 

 


It's a Girl! African Elephant Newborn on Exhibit at San Diego Zoo

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Just hours after her birth on August 28, a baby African Elephant made her public debut at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park. The female calf was born at 3:39 a.m. to the Safari Park's matriarch, Swazi. The baby was on her feet within a few minutes of birth; her first tentative steps were captured on the video below. The calf was born on exhibit so when the Park opened at 9 a.m., guests were already able to see Swazi and her newborn!

Mom and baby are doing well and spending these first days bonding. They can be seen daily at the Park's elephant habitat or you can watch them live via the ElephantCam on the Park's web site or Safari Park iPhone app. The average gestation period for African Elephants is 649 days -- or 22 months. A newborn elephant normally weighs between 200 to 268 pounds (90-121 kg); this little calf weighed in at 205 pounds (92 kg). 

The Safari Park is now home to 13 elephants - 4 adults and 9 youngsters. The adults were rescued in 2003 from the Kingdom of Swaziland, where they faced being culled. A lack of space and long periods of drought created unsuitable habitat for a large elephant population in the small southern African country. At the San Diego Zoo and the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, elephant studies are underway on nutrition, daily walking distance, growth and development and bio-acoustic communication. Since 2004, San Diego Zoo Global has contributed $30,000 yearly to Swaziland's Big Game Parks to fund programs like anti-poaching patrols, improve infrastructure and purchase additional acreage for the Big Game Parks. 

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Photo Credits: Ken Bohn/San Diego Zoo

 


San Diego Zoo Conducts First Exam of Giant Panda Cub

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Photo credit: Ken Bohn, San Diego Zoo

San Diego Zoo's newest Giant Panda cub received its first veterinary exam this morning.  The quick, 3-minute exam allowed staff just enough time to determine that the cub is healthy, thriving and weighs 1.5 pounds. Vets were able to listen to the cub's heart and lungs - which sounded good - but were not able to determine the sex.

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The paws of this cub might be tiny now, but they will grow into one of the most interesting paws in the animal kingdom. Giant Pandas have a pseudo thumb, which enhances their ability to gather and eat bamboo. No other species of bear (yes, they are definitively bears thanks to molecular testing!) has this distinctive trait.

 

This is the sixth Giant Panda born at the San Diego Zoo, the most born at a breeding facility outside of China. All six Giant Panda births have been to mother Bai Yun. The previous cub born at the San Diego Zoo was a male named Yun Zi. Born on Aug. 5, 2009, his name means "son of cloud."


Spot On! Newly Born Jaguar Cubs at San Diego Zoo

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One of two Jaguar cubs born at the San Diego Zoo on April 27 takes its turn on the scale. The 12-day-old cub, which weighs 4.2 pounds, is still too young to get on and off the scale on its own. The two unnamed siblings will remain in the den for a couple of months until they are able to walk outdoors on their own. Keepers have yet to determine the sex of the cubs. The pair are the first Jaguars born at the San Diego Zoo since 1989.

Although these two young cubs may look adorable, females can grow to 70 pounds while males can reach 120 pounds. Jaguars are the largest cat in the Western Hemisphere and the third largest of the world's cats. The South American native word for Jaguar, yaguara, means "animal that kills in a single bound."

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Photo credit: Ken Bohn / San Diego Zoo

Unfortunately, demand for the Jaguar's beautiful rosette-covered fur is one of the reasons this species is endangered. In addition, loss of habitat and the human-animal conflict have reduced populations of Jaguars throughout their range from North America through South America.


Twin Sumatran Tiger Cubs for San Diego Zoo Safari Park

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These two Sumatran Tiger cubs were recently born at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park. This is the 24th and 25th births of this critically endangered species for the Zoo. 

The cubs are still too small to leave their den and are being attentively raised by their experienced mother, Delta. On Thursday, keepers gave Mom a short break to stretch her legs and get a little sun while they took the opportunity to socialize with the cubs as shown in the video below. The 10- and 11-pound cubs are being desensitized to human touch in anticipation of vaccines and other necessary veterinary care.They are only just beginning to move around the den on their own paws. Keepers expect them to be more agile and ready to explore the outdoors in July.

Only about 400 Sumatran tigers are left worldwide. They're the smallest of the tiger species, but once grown, males can weigh up to 220 lbs. The San Diego Zoo is home to six Sumatran tigers and is fund-raising to build a new, forested tiger haven that will offer up-close views and highlight conservation efforts

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Photo Credit: San Diego Zoo

 


One Day Old Capybara Trots Out to Say Hello

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This single capybara baby made its public debut yesterday at the San Diego Zoo in California. At only one day old, this little baby weighs 3 - 5 pounds (1.36-2.27 kgs) and has teeth that let it nibble on grasses!

In fact, the word capybara means "master of the grass" and its scientific name, Hydrochoerus, means "water hog" because of its love for water. The capybara, however, is not a pig as that implies, but the world's largest rodent species. An adult male can weigh up to 141 pounds and a female up to 146 pounds! and end up to be about two feet tall.

Capybara are highly social and live in groups controlled by a dominant male. Capybara females in a group are known to help care for and even nurse each other's young. This is the second capybara born in the past week and at this time, its gender is unknown.

Capybara are found in Panama, Colombia, Venezuela, the Guyanas and Peru, south through Brazil, Paraguay, northeast Argentina, and Uruguay. Semi-aquatic, they frequent dense vegetation surrounding lakes, rivers, swamps, marshes, and ponds.

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Photo Credits: Sand Diego Zoo


Trinka the Wallaby Thrives After a Rocky Start

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Trinka, an endangered Parma Wallaby joey, is being hand raised at the San Diego Zoo nursery. Her name is an Australian aboriginal word for daytime. She's small but strong, and her keepers describe her as sweet and expressive. She was found on the ground outside her mother's pouch when she was very small and had to be hand raised at the San Diego Zoo nursery. She was given a faux "pouch" to snuggle into and she comes out of it for a little exercise during the day. Feeding small babies like Trinka can be difficult, but the San Diego Zoo keepers are experts, and Trinka is doing great finishing off her four bottles a day.

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Photo credits: Ken Bohn, San Diego


Meet Poco the Paca

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Ken Bohn, San Diego Zoo Safari Park

This is the first time a Paca has been hand raised at the San Diego Zoo or the Safari Park. Keepers hope he will one day be an animal ambassador, who does education programs at the Safari Park. The affectionate rodent was born Sept. 7, 2011.

"He's getting bottles four times a day of formula that mimics his mom's milk," said Kim Millspaugh, a senior keeper.  "From Day 1 he also was eating solids and he enjoys almonds, figs, and green bell peppers. His favorite is oranges."

Guests can see the baby paca, which looks a bit like a spotted watermelon on short legs, in the nursery called the Animal Care Center.


Have You 'Herd'? Baby Elephant Makes Three at San Diego Zoo

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Umngani is a mom again at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park. The African elephant gave birth to a male calf at 5:45 a.m. Monday, September 26, making her the first elephant in this herd to give birth to three calves.

Umngani, her 5-year-old daughter, Khosi, and her 2-year-old son, Ingadze, can be seen by Safari Park visitors as they watch over the newest member of the family, who is as yet unnamed. Khosi, whose nickname is “the babysitter,” is living up to her reputation, proving to be a wonderful big sister! She keeps a watchful eye on the calf, making sure he doesn’t stray far from their mother. Khosi also places her body between the newborn calf and the rest of the curious elephant herd.

Umngani and her three calves will continue to bond in the upper yard, separate from the rest of the herd, while the newborn gets steady on his feet, learns to follow his mother closely, and has at least a full day of nursing to make him strong. The Safari Park is now home to 18 elephants: 8 adults and 10 youngsters.The adults were rescued in 2003 from the Kingdom of Swaziland, where they faced being culled. 

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Photo Credit: San Deigo Zoo