Primate

Two Baby Gorillas In One Month!

Baby-Gorilla-NC-Zoo-5

It had been 23 years since a baby Gorilla was born at North Carolina Zoo when on August 4th, "Bomassa", a healthy male, was born to 12-year-old "Jamani". Weeks later, on August 31st, a second yet-to-be-named baby Gorilla was born to mother "Olympia".

The rare births are cause for celebration not only for N.C. Zoo but also for the entire Gorilla Species Survival Plan (SSP®), the group responsible for the long-term sustainability of the western lowland gorilla population in North American zoos. With these births, the Gorilla SSP moves closer to its target population size of 360 individuals in 52 zoos.

Baby-Gorilla-NC-Zoo-2

Baby-Gorilla-NC-Zoo

Baby-Gorilla-NC-Zoo-7

Baby-Gorilla-NC-Zoo-8
Photo credit: Tom Gillespie / North Carolina Zoo

Continue reading "Two Baby Gorillas In One Month!" »


Baby Siamang Swings into Tel Aviv

Baby Siamang and Mom at Tel Aviv Zoo

Earlier this month, Siamang mom and dad, Jamby and Jan (Jan is the boy), welcomed their first baby, which also marks the first baby Siamang for Zoological Center Tel Aviv Ramat Gan. Even though Jamby's pregnancy lasted eight months, the healthy baby weighed in at just 170 grams (1/3rd of a pound)!

When these Siamangs first arrived at Zoo Tel Aviv, they were exhibited with the Orangutans but the match was not meant to be. Jamby and Jan felt the need assert their dominance over their gentle roommates. When keepers decided the Siamangs were being bullies, the red apes were relocated.

Siamangs are endangered in their native home of Southeast Asia due to habitat destruction.

Baby Siamang Close-up Tel Aviv Zoo

Baby Siamang at Tel Aviv ZooPhoto credits: Tibor Jäger


Baby Mouse Lemur Season Finale!

Baby Mouse Lemur Duke Lemur Center

Back in July we brought you Duke Lemur Center's first batch of wriggling baby Mouse Lemurs! Today we officially bring the season to a close and what a successful one it's been! A total of twenty infants, ten males and ten females, have been born this summer with the last birth on August 10th. The oldest mouse moms were four year olds Oleander and Calendula and the youngest was 10 month old Nettle. 

_3DH2762_mm 7113 4114 _ b 13 July 12

As an added bonus, Duke Lemur Center has also shared photos of their tiny Fat-tailed Dwarf Lemur babies, marking the first successful birth of this species since 1987! This unique animal is the only tropical mammal as well as only primate anywhere known to hibernate. Unlike cold weather hibernators, the Fat-tailed Dwarf Lemur appears to enter periods of dormancy during drought. While hibernating, this lemur lives off of stores of fat in its tail. Despite having a name that's a mouthful, this species is one of the smallest of all primates.

_3DH3108_cm7123 7124 7125ED

_3DH3109_cm7123 7124 7125EDjpg

_3DH3115_cm7123 7124 7125EDPhoto credits: David Haring / Duke Lemur Center


Better Bottle Feed That Baby!

Blank-Park-Zoo-1

Keepers at Des Moines, Iowa's Blank Park Zoo sprang into action when it became clear the mother of a new born baby Japanese Macaque was neglecting her infant. The female baby monkey, born April 20, is now being bottle fed every couple of hours and will remain in keepers' care until she is fully weaned and able to rejoin the Macaque troop. 

“This is a positive step forward for the Japanese macaque breeding program, but we can’t call it a success until the mothers learn how to care for their young” said Kevin Drees, director of animal care and conservation. “None of our females of breeding age have raised a baby before so that is why keepers had to intervene.”

Blank-Park-Zoo-2

Blank-Park-Zoo

 

Japanese macaques are threatened due to deforestation and the loss of their habitat. As human development invades the territories of these macaques, human and macaque encounters increase, and about 5000 macaques are captured or shot each year (despite protection from the Japanese government) for they are considered as agricultural pests.

Continue reading "Better Bottle Feed That Baby! " »


Double Mongoose Lemur Trouble At Busch Gardens

BG-Mongoose-Lemur-5

Earlier this month, Busch Gardens witnessed an uncommon event: the birth of Mongoose Lemur twins. On Friday, April 6, the two babies were born to 17-year-old mother Rosalita and 18-year-old father Guillermo. Rosalita’s first baby – a male named Duggan – was also born at Busch Gardens and moved to another zoo for breeding. Mongoose Lemurs are classified as a “vulnerable” species, and Busch Gardens takes part in Species Survival Plans (SSP) initiated by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) to cooperatively manage breeding programs for threatened or endangered species in accredited institutions. 

Busch Gardens zoo staff aren’t yet sure if the new babies are male or female. All baby Mongoose Lemurs look the same at birth, but around 6-8 months of age, males start to change color and develop their red “beard” and cheeks. Females have a darker face and white beard. 

Look closely in the pictures below to spot the babies tucked under mom's leg!

BG-Mongoose-Lemur-3

BG-Mongoose-Lemur-2

BG-Mongoose-Lemur-4
Photo credit: Matt Marriott / Busch Gardens Tampa Bay

The Mongoose Lemur, like all Lemurs, is indigenous to the island of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean, but they are one of only two species of Lemur to also live in an area outside the island: Mongoose Lemurs can be found on the Comoros Islands between Madagascar and Africa.


A Star Is Born!

Mangabey_Museum-of-Natural-Historylead

The zoo at Paris' Museum of Natural History, called The Menagerie, just announced the birth of a tiny male White-collared Mangabey. Born on March 5th, baby "Loango" was rejected by his birth mother. Keepers at The Menagerie stepped in to hand-rear the newborn and so far he is doing extremely well. The visiting public can see Loango at feeding times eating cooked veggies and fresh fruits and taking milk from a bottle. Loango represents a very rare captive birth for an endangered species, which is the subject of a European breeding program (EEP). The playful and mischievous monkey will remain in constant visual contact with his family until he is ready to join them in a few weeks.

Mangabey_Museum-of-Natural-History2

Mangabey_Museum-of-Natural-History7
Photo credit: Jérôme Munier / MNHN

Many more images beneath the fold...

Continue reading "A Star Is Born!" »


Baby Mongoose... Lemur!

Mongoose-Leumr-Sacramento-Zoo

Is it a boy or a girl? Only time will tell. All baby Mongoose Lemurs are born looking like females. However, at around 6-8 months, males begin to change color and develop their trademark black masks. These pictures were taken yesterday at Sacramento Zoo, when the little Lemur was just ten days old. 

Infant Mongoose Lemurs cling tightly to mom’s waist (like in the picture below) and are weaned between five and seven months. Mongoose Lemurs tend to live in small groups of three to four consisting of a mature pair and their immature offspring. The Ankarafantsika Reserve is the only protected area in Madagascar for the Mongoose Lemur. It is under heavy pressure due to forest clearance for pasture, charcoal production and croplands.

Mongoose Leumr Sacramento Zoo 2
Photo credit: Sacramento Zoo

Can you spot the baby in the photo above?


A New Ring-tailed Lemur Baby for Toronto Zoo

CU

What's new at the Toronto Zoo? A baby Ring-tailed Lemur. Mom, Lily, gave birth to the little one on March 5... although the baby's father is a mystery, keepers believe it was most likely Lionel or Larry.

The gender of the baby will remain undetermined until the baby leaves the comfort of mom's furry chest. It's a natural instinct to separate and start exploring at about one month old.

Ring-tailed lemurs are only found on the island of Madagascar, and like all lemurs, are at risk from habitat destruction as jungle is converted to farmland. Sociable vegetarians, Ring-tails are currently listed as 'Threatened' by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. 

Mom
Photo Credit: Toronto Zoo 


Golden Lion Tamarin Babies Are A Boon For Conservation

Loewenaeffchen_3384

The arrival of new baby Golden Lion Tamarins on February 14th has brought particular joy to Zoo Basel. Castor (17) and Lilian (5) have become an experienced breeding pair with their second delivery of twins. Last year, they made the headlines with Basel Zoo’s first golden lion tamarin birth in twenty years. This year’s two baby Monkeys are full of energy and doing very well.

The zoo has had to wait a long time for these happy events, as the last opportunity to marvel at young golden lion tamarins in Basel was twenty years ago. The first pairing between Castor, from Sweden, and Lilian, imported from Holland, took place following an approach phase of just under two years in exile whilst the monkey house was being renovated. Apparently they now feel equally at home in the re-opened monkey house, demonstrated by the arrival of their two offspring on 14th February this year. Twin births are common in Tamarin and Marmoset pairings, and are standard for Golden Lion Tamarins.

Screen shot 2012-03-17 at 12.51.27 PM

Loewenaeffchen_0878

Loewenaeffchen__ZOO7639
Photo credit: Zoo Basel

Golden Lion Tamarins live in family groups of up to ten. In Brazil’s Atlantic rainforest, their area of origin, a family will claim a territory covering an area at least four times the size of Basel Zoo. What is particularly fascinating about these monkeys is the way in which social frameworks vary greatly from family to family. The most common framework is a pairing for life (monogamy), followed by a female with multiple male mates (polyandry) and a male with multiple female mates (polygyny). All members of the group are needed to successfully rear young. For example, the father offers energetic help in carrying the young monkeys around on his back.

Continue reading "Golden Lion Tamarin Babies Are A Boon For Conservation" »


Mugwai and Gremlin Welcome Their First-born!

Lar Gibbon Paradise Wildlife Park3

Paradise Wildlife Park in Broxbourne, U.K. is proud to announce the arrival of a baby Lar Gibbon born to mother Mugwai and father Gremlin on Thursday 5th January 2012. Mother and Baby are doing very well. Section Leader of Primates, Steve Goodwin says, “This is the first baby for Mugwai, but she is proving to be a really good mum. We haven't been able to get close enough to sex the baby yet, and we're excited to find out if it is a boy or a girl.”

Also known as a White-headed Gibbon, this endangered species is threatened in the wild by habitat destruction, the illegal pet trade, and poaching.

Lar Gibbon Paradise Wildlife Park2

Lar Gibbon Paradise Wildlife Park6

Lar Gibbon Paradise Wildlife Park

Lar Gibbon Paradise Wildlife Park5

Lar Gibbon Paradise Wildlife Park7
Photo credit: Paradise Wildlife Park