Prague Zoo

Take a peek at Prague Zoo's baby Tapir!

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The Czech Republic’s Prague Zoo celebrated the birth of a Malayan Tapir on November 6.  Born to mother Ivana, the male baby is only the second Tapir ever born in the history of the zoo.

The baby’s birth lasted only 30 minutes, and the calf was immediately “alive and kicking,” according to staff reports.  For now, the calf prefers to stay close to Ivana in the zoo’s exhibit.

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All Malayan Tapir calves are born with a dappled brown and white coat, which offers excellent camouflage in its native southeast Asian rain forest.  By the time the baby is about six months old, it will develop the solid black and white coloration of the adults. 

Malayan Tapirs are endangered.  Once found throughout the Malay peninsula and the Indonesian island of Sumatra, their range has been drastically fragmented in recent years due to deforestation, damming of rivers, and illegal trade. 

Photo Credit:  Prague Zoo


Five Bat-eared Fox Kits are Zoo Prague's Newest Handful

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Prague Zoo has a new litter of Bat-eared foxes. The first weeks of their lives involve snuggling close to mom within a safe underground burrow, but the quintuplets are now venturing out into their exhibit. The adult foxes in the zoo's Bat-eared Fox family must patiently endure love bites and playful attacks from their young during these first weeks.

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Photo credit: Tomáš Adamec, Prague Zoo


Giraffe Lovers Look No Further... Two Calves Born At Prague Zoo!

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It was a very busy weekend at Prague Zoo. Two Giraffes were born within 12 hours of each other! Three-time mother Diana delivered her 4th calf on Friday evening and nine-time mother Kleopatra gave birth to her 10th. Kleopatra is the oldest female Giraffe at Prague Zoo. These two babies are the 73rd and 74th Rothschild Giraffes ever  born at Prague Zoo. They are 3rd and 4th born this year. Rothschild Giraffes are an endangered subspecies of Giraffe, particularly at risk of hybridization with other subspecies. While difficult to "spot", one feature that distinguishes this subspecies from other giraffe subspecies is a 5th horn that sticks up out of the center of its forehead.

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Photo credit: Tomáš Adamec, Zoo Praha

Jump below the fold to see all the pictures!

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Two Little Reindeer Born at Prague Zoo

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Prague's Zoo Praha has two new baby reindeer, a boy and a girl. The male was born on Friday the 13th and the female came along about three days later. They went out in the zoo's large paddock for visitors to see for the first time on April 20. The mothers can be seen with their babies following closely behind them.  The father of both is Mirda, who himself was born in Prague Zoo.

Their large, broad hooves spread apart to form a nearly circular print and help them navigate the soft ground that covers much of the tundra in which they live in the wild. They also aid in digging for food under the snow. 

Reindeer are a species of deer found in the far northern areas of arctic Europe, Asia, and North America extending onto the tundra above the tree-line. They are called Caribou in America. Domesticated for thousands of years, they were mainly used as beasts of burden and farmed for milk, meat and their hides, reindeer have been the economic basis of the Lapp culture. Today they are raised in many areas of the world outside of their native arctic.

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Photo Credit: Tomáš Adamec, Zoo Praha


Double Delight: Two Rothschild Giraffe Babies for Prague Zoo

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There are two reasons to celebrate this month at Prague Zoo. After 14 months of gestation, two Rothschild Giraffe calves were born within days of each other. The first arrived on February 9, born to mom Nora, one of the best known animals at the Zoo. Nora is 13 years old and a very experienced mother -- this is her fifth baby and she successfully raised all but the first on her own. The father of the newborn is the twelve-year-old Johan. Their calf is a female and has been named Apolena.

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Just two days later, on February 11, another female in the herd named Eliška began to go into labor. She had not eaten anything since the morning and was nervously pacing up and down the dormitory. As if to lend support, Nora paid close attention to Eliška's process from the neighboring dorm. Eliška successfully gave birth to a little male, cleaning him thoroughly. He stood and suckled soon after. His name will be chosen out of three options by public vote.

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Photo Credit: Photos 1-4, Tomas Adamec/Prague Zoo, Photo 5: Martin Smrček/Zoo Praha


Ringing In The New Year With 6 Tiny Turtle Hatchlings

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Zoo Prague rang in the New Year with the hatching of six baby Leopard Tortoises. Three of the six had hatched yesterday and the remaining three emerged in time for New Year's day. The fourth largest Turtle species in the world, Leopard Tortoises can grow to be 28 inches long and weigh 120 pounds! The striking pattern on its shell gives the Leopard Tortoise it's name. While little is known about the reproduction requirements for these Tortoises, Zoo Prague were the first breeders of the species to learn that cool temperatures (between 10 and 15 degrees celsius) were needed for the initial development of their eggs.

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Photo credit: Peter Velenský, Prague Zoo

More photos after the jump...

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Bush Baby Hat Trick for Prague Zoo!

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Three Senegal Bush Babies (also known as Galagos) were born at the Prague Zoo in the Czech Republic on October 5th. On wednesday, zoo veterinarians gave the three their first medical check up. The babies are from two different litters, despite having been born all on the same day. This trio of tree dwellers includes two males and a female. Bush Babies use sensitive hearing and ears which can bend one at a time to hear their prey which includes birds and insects. Fruit, seeds, flowers, eggs, nuts, and tree gums make up the rest of their omnivorous diet.

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Photo credits: Zoo Prague


Two New Animal Babies for Prague Zoo

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In the Children's Zoo at Zoo Praha in Prague something special happened: two furry babies - an alpaca llama and dwarf zebu -- were born. Both are thriving under the care of their mothers.

Alpaca are related to the camel and the llama. Once nearly driven to extinction by Spanish conquerors, a small number survived high in the Andes Mountains, thanks to their adaptability. Now they populate the mountain plateaus in Chile, Bolivia and Peru. Highly pirzed for their luxurious coats, the alpaca has been a treasured blessing to the people who live near them. Their fleece grows in abundance, in 22 naturally different shades, from black to champagne color, and is easy to shear to make coats, hats, and the like. They are very low maintenance, needing little to drink or eat. They nibble at grasses and do no harm to trees and other plants. 

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Dwarf Zebu like the ones below are a kind of cow and stand about 4 feet tall (1.22 meters), with a large hump on the shoulders. They have long, slender legs, and a large dewlap -- a fold of loose skin that hangs from the neck. Unlike many other horned animals, their horns point forward.

Found primarily in Sri Lanka, India, and Nepal, they have been mostly domesticated and become very helpful draft animals. Their small size allows them to survive on scarce food supplies, so they are easier to maintain than larger cattle.

Due to the gentle nature of both, these animals make perfect ambassadors for their species in the Children's Zoo, where kids can get up close as they learn about them. 

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Photo Credit: Tomas Adamec/Prague Zoo


UPDATE: Tiny Tano Now Taking Visitors!

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Recently, ZooBorns reported on Tano the infant Gorilla's move from Prague Zoo to Wilhelma in Stuttgart, Germany. Tano has successfully completed his quarantine period and beginning today, lucky visitors can view the tiny Gorilla between 11.30 and 12 Noon. Tano can also be seen during his feeding times, although there is no set time table for these.

For the past three weeks, Tano has been cared for around the clock by surrogate mothers nurses Bea Jarczewski, Margot Federer and Thali Bauer. For now, the most important things in this little Gorilla baby's life are sleep, warmth, body contact, cuddling, vocalization, and of course, milk when he is hungry!

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Photo credit: Wilhelma / Th. Bauer


Tiny Tano Finds a Home After a Rocky Start

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Wilhelma Zoo in Stuttgart, Germany is now home to Tano, a tiny baby Gorilla who was transported from his birth place in Zoo Prague just a week ago. His inexperienced mother Bikira was unable to care for him, so Zoo Prague moved him to Wilhelma in coordination with the European Endangered Species Programme. Tiny Tano is not a complete stranger to Wilhelma, he is the great-grandson of former Stuttgart gorillas Dina and Banjo. His mother Bikira was also hand raised at Wilhelma  from 1995 to 1998. Tano has been doing very well in his new surroundings so far, being expertly hand-reared by keepers, he is sleeping well and drinking plenty of milk.

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Photo credits: Wilhelma Zoo

Listen closely for the tiny breaths Tano takes as he adjusts himself in his surrogate mother's arms in this video below.

It's been quite a start to life for little Tano.  While at Zoo Prague, keepers rushed him to an incubator because without the body warmth of Bikira, he would not have survived. Attempts were made to return him to his mother's arms. Sadly, these were unsuccessful. In order to ensure the infant's survival, hand-rearing was the only option. The combination of round the clock care, a hot water bottle and a fur cloth as well as a device to mimic the beating of a gorilla mother's heart are all employed to ensure as normal an infancy as possible under the difficult circumstances.

There are a number of short videos and another picture beneath the fold...

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