Pangolin

Endangered Pangolin Receives Special Care

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On September 30th, the Taipei Zoo welcomed the birth of a female Pangolin, named “Gung-wu”.

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Pangolin taipei 5Photo Credits: Taipei Zoo

The tiny Pangolin, born with eyes half open, began crawling, within an hour of birth, in search of nourishment from her mother. Although the Pangolin mother was a willing participant, she was unable to provide an adequate supply of milk for the new baby.

Zoo staff were patient with the new mother, but when the baby began to lose weight, the decision was made to intervene on behalf of the newborn.  Now, zoo keepers provide 24 hour care and feeding for “Gung-wu”, and her weight and health have stabilized. 

Pangolins are mammals of the order Pholidota.  They are nocturnal insectivores and are native to Africa and Asia. As a result of increasing threats to Pangolins, mainly in the form of illegal, international trade in Pangolin skin, scales and meat, these species have received increasing conservation attention in recent years. In 2014, the IUCN (International Union for the Conservation of Nature) re-categorized all eight species of Pangolin on its Red List of Threatened Species, and each species is now classified as “Critically Endangered”.

More great photos below the fold!

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Rare Sunda Pangolin Born in Singapore

Radin the Sunda pangolin hitches a ride on Nita as their keeper looks on

In celebration of World Animal Day this year, Wildlife Reserves Singapore announced the arrival of some of the world’s rarest babies, and among them, a critically endangered Sunda Pangolin. 

Radin the Sunda pangolin being measured by his keeper

Radin the Sunda pangolin in the protective clutch of his mother, Nita

Sunda pangolins Radin and Nita in Night Safari Photo Credits: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

The new baby, ‘Radin’, was born July 13th to his protective mother, ‘Nita’. The birth of the critically endangered Sunda Pangolin, in the Night Safari, is one of the most iconic births for WRS. The species is native to Singapore and is the logo for the Wildlife Reserves Singapore Conservation Fund. 

Night Safari is the world’s first zoological institution to house the elusive, solitary, and nocturnal creature. In recent years, the endangered Sunda Pangolin has been driven closer to extinction by illegal trafficking, habitat loss and being hunted for their meat and scales at an unsustainable level. According to the IUCN Red List, there have been suspected population declines of around 80% over the past 21 years, and there is a projected future decline of greater that 80% during the next several decades.

Accredited zoos and reserves, like Wildlife Reserves Singapore, are crucial to the future survival of the species. This is the third successful birth of a Sunda Pangolin in WRS since 2011.


A Lizard...? An Anteater...? A Pangolin!

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Pangolins are nocturnal mammals that spend their nights hunting ants and termites and their days curled up in a ball. While they might look like an armadillo, anteater or even a walking artichoke, these unique animals belong to a family all their own. Only a handful of zoos around the world exhibit Pangolins, which are endangered in the wild, making the December birth of this little Chinese Pangolin at the Taipei Zoo an extremely rare occurrence. The toothless pup was found by zoo staffers last month in a hole its mother made after they tried to move her to a heated room during a cold front.

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Newborn Pangolin with closed eyes at the Taipei ZooPhoto credits: Taipei Zoo

Reportedly this baby Pangolin spends its days sleeping, drinking milk and climbing on mom's back for the occasional ride. Check out ZooBorns' last Pangolin pup we shared in 2009!


Orphaned Pangolin Baby

Yes, it's a mammal!  Zoo keepers at Thailand's Dusit Zoo nurse a baby Pangolin. Villagers found the baby abandoned on a roadside in the outskirts of Bangkok. Pangolins curl up when frightened, exposing sharp scales for defense. Babies, like this one photograped Tuesday, have much softer scales, which harden as they mature.

APTOPIX_Thailand_Pangolin_SL101_822596109062009_741765874 SAKCHAI LALIT, AP