Rothschild Giraffe Born at Dublin Zoo

1_DublinZoo_RothschildCalfDublin Zoo is celebrating the birth of a male Rothschild Giraffe. The calf was born October 25th and stands tall at 1.5 meters (5 feet) and weighs an estimated 45 kg (99 lbs.).

The giraffe calf made his first outside appearance in the Dublin Zoo’s African Savanna at four-days-old. He joins a herd of eight Rothschild Giraffes at Dublin Zoo.



4_DublinZoo_RothschildCalfPhoto Credits: Dublin Zoo

Team leader at Dublin Zoo, Helen Clarke-Bennett said, “The calf was born in the giraffe house with the other female members of the herd present. The team watched the birth unfold on our closed circuit cameras. The birth took over an hour and we noticed that the herd was very attentive each step of the way. We’re very excited about this addition to the Dublin Zoo herd.”

The Rothschild Giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis rothschildi), also known as the Baringo Giraffe, is one of the most threatened of the nine sub-species of giraffe. It is named after the Tring Museum’s founder, Walter Rothschild.

All individuals living in the wild are in protected areas in Kenya and Uganda. The Rothschild Giraffe is at risk of hybridization and is currently classified as “Endangered” on the IUCN Red List.

The Rothschild Giraffe is distinguishable from other subspecies because of its coloring. Where as the Reticulated Giraffe has very defined dark patches with bright channels between, the Rothschild has paler, orange-brown patches that are less defined. Also, the Rothschild has no markings on the lower leg.

This subspecies mate any time of year and have a gestation period of 14 to 16 months, typically giving birth to a single calf. They prefer to live in small herds, with adult males and females only mixing for mating. Males are larger than females and tend to be darker in color.

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Meet Shedd Aquarium’s Latest Rescue ‘Pup’

1_Peach D75Q2320Meet Peach-- a 10-month-old Dachshund/Terrier mix that was born in the southern United States. Found tied to a dumpster and bearing the marks of neglect (as evidenced by the scar running the length of her back), she was placed in a nearby high-kill shelter.

Through the help of volunteers, Peach eventually found her way to The Anti-Cruelty Society in Chicago, Illinois. Once in the Chicago area, more good fortune was provided for the friendly dog. Officials at The Anti-Cruelty Society thought she was an excellent candidate for a special rescue and rehabilitation program at Shedd Aquarium

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4_Peach D75Q2309Photo Credits: Shedd Aquarium/Brenna Hernandez ; Video footage: Sam CejtinPeach is currently being integrated into Shedd Aquarium’s dog program. The focus for now is getting her acclimated to her new home and building a positive and trusting relationship with her trainers. As with all other animals, she will make progress in her training as her comfort level allows. Shedd’s animal care staff is confident that she will make a smooth transition to her new home. She is young and her socialization will begin immediately – both with trainers and other dogs.  

Since her arrival at Shedd Aquarium, Peach has been nothing but very sweet. She is already open to interacting with people, and she is very playful with the other dogs at the aquarium. According to Shedd tradition, Peach was named after a character in the popular animated feature, Finding Nemo.

Peach currently weighs a healthy 20 pounds, and she has a short black coat with a large white spot on her chest.

She is the seventh dog to be adopted by Shedd Aquarium from a Chicago-area shelter, since 2013, and one of four dogs currently at the aquarium; two other animals have since been adopted into loving homes. These animals connect guests to living world, highlighting the “Shedd Way” of training through positive reinforcement and demonstrating how individuals can build strong relationships with the animals in their lives.

Peach may eventually be included in the aquarium’s “One World” show, which focuses on the interconnectivity of the living world and the impact we have on our shared environments.

Just as Shedd rescues endangered Sea Otters, Rock Iguanas, Corals and other threatened species, guests can make a difference for animals by adopting pets from shelters. Each year, 3 million unwanted dogs just like Peach (and Shedd’s other rescue dogs: Marlin, Dory and Kobe) are euthanized; nearly 90 percent of those deaths could be avoided with the right training. Shedd Aquarium’s dogs are examples of the potentially great companions that are just waiting for the right owners at animal shelters around the country.

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Baby Gibbon A First For Indianapolis Zoo

Gibbon baby-Carla Knapp

A baby White-handed Gibbon born at the Indianapolis Zoo on October 23 is the first offspring for its parents and the first Gibbon ever born at the zoo!Gibbon baby2-Carla Knapp

Koko and baby-Carla Knapp
Koko and baby2-Carla KnappPhoto Credit:  Carla Knapp

Zoo keepers do not yet know the gender of the little Gibbon, because for the first several weeks the baby clings tightly to mom’s belly.  These gripping skills are important, because mom uses both arms to swing through the trees in a fluid motion called brachiation.  That means it’s up to the baby to hang on by gripping mom’s fur.  Mom helps a bit by holding her legs up to create a supportive “seat” for the baby.

Though this is the first baby for female Koko and her mate Elliot, both are doing a great job caring for their infant.  White-handed Gibbons’ fur colors include tan, brown, and black.  The baby takes after Koko and has black fur.

Native to Southeast Asia, Gibbons are known for their elaborate vocalizations, which mated pairs engage in daily as a way to reinforce their bond.  These Apes also sing to announce their territories to other Gibbons.  As it grows, the baby Gibbon will join its parents’ song.

White-handed Gibbons are listed as Endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature due to illegal hunting and habitat loss from forest clearing for agriculture and the construction of non-sustainable palm oil plantations.


UPDATE: Giant Panda Cubs Triple Their Weight


Twin Giant Panda cubs born on October 13 at the Toronto Zoo have tripled their weights but are still in a critical period of their infancy.

12194619_918029888233457_4091861711405412373_oPhoto Credit:  Toronto Zoo

You first met the cubs on ZooBorns a few weeks after their birth. Their mother, Er Shun, has been providing excellent care, but zoo keepers help her by ‘twin-swapping’ – one baby stays with Er Shun while the other is moved to an incubator every few hours.  This allows each infant to be nursed and cared for by Er Shun equally.

The cubs weighed 187 and 115 grams at birth.  At 21 days old, the cubs’ weights had increased to 672 and 422 grams.  In addition, they had each grown six centimeters in length.

If you look closely at the photographs, you can see the cubs’ black-and-white markings beginning to appear as their fur comes in  On their tiny paws, you can see grooves developing on their pseudo thumb pads – these grooves will enable them to hold bamboo when they get much older.

Giant Pandas live in only a few mountain ranges in central China, usually at elevations between 5,000 – 10,000 feet.  In these cool, misty forests, Giant Pandas forage for bamboo, which comprises 99% of their diet, about 10 to 16 hours a day. 

Only about 1,600 Giant Pandas remain in the wild.  About 300 live in zoos and breeding centers around the world, mostly in China.  Giant Pandas are listed as Endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

Reluctant Red Panda Gets the Perfect Name


Drusillas Park, in East Sussex UK, shared news of the birth of a Red Panda this summer. The female cub was born July 17th and is the third to be born at the zoo since 2013.

Mum has looked after the cub in the safety and privacy of their nest box. Although some have been lucky enough to see mum, Mulan, transporting her cub between nesting houses.


3_DrusillasPark_RedPanda_ShylaPhoto Credits: Tammy Smith (Images 1,2,3) / Drusillas Park (4)

Head Keeper, Mark Kenward commented after the cub’s birth, “The Red Pandas have three separate nest boxes, and Mulan will move the baby from one to another, carrying her by the scruff of the neck, so she benefits from the most suitable environment.”

“Mulan is proving to be an excellent mother once again. For the first two days, she remained with her cub approximately 90% of the time. However, after a few days this dropped to around 60%, which is exactly what we would expect of this species.”

Drusillas Park has given the bashful new Red Panda a befitting name-- Shyla.

For the last four months Shyla has been hiding away within one of the group’s three nest boxes.

Visitors enjoy regular sightings of the panda puff as she pops her head out the hide away hole. However, despite multiple attempts by mum Mulan to encourage her out, the cozy cub cannot be tempted.

Zoo Manager, Sue Woodgate commented, “Shyla is yet to take those all-important first–steps exploring her enclosure, playing with her sister and meeting our visitors. We have no doubt she will appear in her own good time – her older sister Anmar also took a little while to venture out but you can’t stop her now. Fingers crossed Shyla will follow in her footsteps very soon; I am sure it will be worth the wait.”

The name Shyla was chosen from nearly 200 suggestions, made by followers, on the Drusillas Park Facebook page. Staff thought it a fitting moniker for the ‘peekaboo panda’. 

As with the Giant Panda, female Red Pandas are only fertile for just one day a year and can delay implantation until conditions are favorable. They give birth to between one and four young at a time, and the cubs are born with pale fluffy fur, which darkens to the distinctive red coloration of the adults over the first three months.

In the wild, the Red Panda (Ailurus fulgens) inhabits the Himalayan mountains of China, India and Nepal, where they are threatened by habitat destruction and hunting. They are currently classified as “Vulnerable” on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

This is the second time Drusillas Park has welcomed Red Panda babies since Mulan’s arrival in 2013. On June 16, 2015, she gave birth to mixed-sex twins, the first of this species to be born at the Zoo throughout their 90 year history.

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Tiny Capybara Explores with Mum at Chester Zoo

1_A baby capybara is accompanied by its mother as they explore their enclosure at Chester Zoo (3)

A Capybara was born October 19th at Chester Zoo in the UK. Although just over two-weeks-old, the tiny youngster can already walk and swim. The newborn rodent has also begun eagerly exploring the exhibit with mum.

2_A baby capybara is accompanied by its mother as they explore their enclosure at Chester Zoo (1)

3_A baby capybara is accompanied by its mother as they explore their enclosure at Chester Zoo (2)

4_Capybara-9Photo Credits: Chester Zoo

Capybaras are semi-aquatic mammals and originate from South America. They can grow up to almost 1.5m in length and weigh up to 60kg.

Dr. Nick Davis, Assistant Curator of Mammals at the zoo, said, “Our new arrival is tiny and can barely be seen above the grass when it follows mum on adventures across the paddock. It only weighs a few hundred grams at the moment but, in time, it’ll grow into a really chunky rodent.”

“While the Capybara is not currently classified as an endangered species, it is hunted and poached for its meat and skin, which can be turned into leather. So it’s important that our new arrival helps us raise the profile of this often overlooked species,” Dr. Davis shared.

The sex of the newborn is not currently known by keepers.

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Help Name Indianapolis Zoo's Lion Cub Trio

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ZooBorns recently shared the Indianapolis Zoo’s excitement in welcoming three adorable new African Lion cubs. Two males and a female were born on September 21. They are the first lion cubs born at the Indy Zoo since 2003.

The Zoo is now asking for help selecting names for the feisty cubs. The public can cast their vote in a Facebook poll. Zookeepers originally preselected nine names, but they have narrowed that list to six for the public vote. The three most popular names will become the names for the cubs.


The selected names, along with their pronunciation and meaning, are:

Enzi (ehn-ZEE), “powerful”

Mashaka (mash-AH-kah), “troublemaker”

Zuberi (zuw-BEH-ree), “strong”

Leland (LEE-lahnd), “meadowland”

Sukari (sue-CAR-ee), “sweet”

Niara (nee-AH-rah), “one with high purpose”


The poll opened at 5am on November 3rd, and voting will close at 11:59pm on Monday, November 30th. The results will be announced on December 1st.

Voting is taking place on the Indianapolis Zoo’s Facebook page:

Facebook users who “like” the Indianapolis Zoo’s page can vote once per day. Additionally, one lucky fan will be chosen at random to receive an Indianapolis Zoo prize pack, which includes a lion plush and a family four-pack of Zoo tickets.

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3_Female cub-Jackie Curts

4_Cub-Jackie CurtsPhoto Credits: Jackie Curts

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Meet the First Greater One-horned Rhino Born in Australia

Greater One horned Rhino calf_Photo by Bobby-Jo Clow_1

Taronga Western Plains Zoo is thrilled to announce the birth of Australia’s first Greater One-horned Rhino calf! The male calf was born early on the morning of October 25th, to first-time mother Amala.

Zoo Keepers are closely monitoring both mother and calf, and although it is still early days, report that both are doing well.

“Amala is being very protective of him,” said Unit Supervisor Jennifer Conaghan. “She is keeping her distance from us and keeping the calf close, which is what we expected to see. In the last couple of days, Amala has brought the calf into a behind the scenes yard, and we’ve been able to monitor things more closely. We have seen the calf suckling and although it is still only days old, we are extremely happy with the situation so far and absolutely thrilled to have this new addition on the ground.” 

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Greater One horner Rhino calf with mother Amala_Photo by Ian AndersonPhoto Credits: Bobby-Jo Clow (Images 1,2); Ian Anderson (Image 3)Taronga Western Plains Zoo is home to three species of rhino: Black Rhino, White Rhino (Africa) and Greater-One horned Rhino (Asia), and they have breeding and conservation programs for all three species.

The Greater One-horned Rhino breeding program commenced in 2009, when Amala arrived from Los Angeles Zoo to join resident male Dora (who came from Nagoya Higashiyama Zoo in Japan).

“This birth is a credit to years of work by the Zoo’s dedicated Life Sciences team to successfully introduce the two, an introduction which has produced a healthy calf following Amala’s 15 month gestation,” said Taronga Western Plains Zoo Director Matthew Fuller. “We’re the only Zoo in Australia to have three species of rhino, and three successful rhino breeding programs, so critical for these species that are all threatened in the wild.”

The Greater One-Horned Rhinoceros is classified as “Vulnerable” on the IUCN Red List, with as few as 2,700 animals left in the wild.

This recent birth follows the exciting arrival of a Black Rhino calf at the Zoo, earlier this year.

“The situation facing wild rhinos is devastating. Taronga actively supports conservation efforts for wild rhinos in Africa, Indonesia and India, including providing funds and support for habitat protection and reforestation, anti poaching and rhino protection units and reduction of human-rhino conflict. We’re also a founding member of the International Rhino Foundation,” said Matt.

Amala and her calf will remain behind the scenes for the coming weeks where they can continue to bond.

Tiny Rescued Sea Turtle Arrives at Temporary Home

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A new Loggerhead Sea Turtle hatchling recently splashed into his new temporary home in the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Open Sea gallery! The tiny turtle will stay at the aquarium for one to two years, while aquarists carefully rear it to a larger size and prepare it for release back into the ocean.

The North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores loans rescued turtles to aquariums around the country as a way to share the story of this endangered species, while the youngsters grow large enough for release. When they are ready, the turtles are flown back to North Carolina for release into their native waters.

In the wild, Loggerheads migrate long distances, so they’re particularly vulnerable to accidental capture by commercial fisheries. The turtles can become caught in shrimp trawler nets or entangled in long-lines.

The Monterey Bay Aquarium recently released its third Loggerhead back into the Atlantic, alongside other rescued reptiles from U.S. zoos and aquariums. To stay updated on the journey of the newly released juvenile loggerhead, who has logged nearly 600 miles in just over a week, follow #TravelingTurtle on Twitter and Instagram! And check out Monterey Bay Aquarium's tumblr to learn how aquariums and zoos across the country are working together to help this endangered species:

Photo and Video Courtesy: Monterey Bay Aquarium

Information about the Sea Turtle Program from North Carolina Aquariums:

Coastal North Carolina is a nesting site for Loggerhead Sea Turtles (Caretta caretta), Green Sea Turtles (Chelonia mydas) and occasionally Leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea) and Kemp’s Ridley (Lepidochelys kempii) Sea Turtles.

Sea Turtles may live for several decades in the open oceans but their lives are most at risk during the first few minutes after they emerge from the nest. Nests deposited on the beach from May through August usually hatch at night from July through October. Hatchlings scramble quickly out of the nest and toward the ocean in a race for life against predators, disorienting light sources and other obstacles.

The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission (WRC) oversees the monitoring of nests and hatchlings through an extensive network of volunteers and institutions, including the North Carolina Aquariums. Sometimes hatchlings are too weak to get to the ocean on their own or are found far from the ocean if they’ve become disoriented. These hatchlings are brought to the Aquariums for a brief period of care prior to being released into the wild. Hatchlings recuperate in a carefully controlled environment, where Aquarists ensure that the animals eat and demonstrate healthy activity such as diving.

Most of these post-crawl hatchlings are released immediately directly into the Gulf Stream offshore. Although detailed movements of juvenile Sea Turtles are not well known, it has been determined that they likely spend their first 15 to 20 years feeding and growing in warmer waters, such as the Gulf Stream, before they reach sexual maturity. It is estimated that one in 1,000 turtles will reach this stage.

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Baby Mandrill Is Zoo's First In 17 Years


After 17 years without a newborn in the Mandrill troop, the staff at Israel’s Ramat Gan Safari Park is celebrating the arrival of a male infant.

0953_2015_10_17_027Photo Credit:  Tibor Jager / Ramat Gan Safari Park

Born to 12-year-old Tinkerbell, the baby is strong and healthy.  Tinkerbell is proving to be a devoted mother to the baby, who was named Tuvia (a new baby’s name always begins with the first letter of the mother’s name).

Native to tropical forests in western central Africa, Mandrills are the largest of all monkey species.  Sexual dimorphism is extremely pronounced in Mandrills.  Males are about twice as large as females and feature red, purple, and light blue skin patches on their faces and rumps.  As Tuvia grows, he will gain the bright colors of an adult male, but for now he is more drably colored like his mother.

Mandrills are listed as Vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.  Major threats include deforestation and hunting for bushmeat.  Some zoo-born Mandrills have been successfully reintroduced into the wild.

See more pictures of Tuvia below.

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