Baby Mandrill Is Zoo's First In 17 Years


After 17 years without a newborn in the Mandrill troop, the staff at Israel’s Ramat Gan Safari Park is celebrating the arrival of a male infant.

0953_2015_10_17_027Photo Credit:  Tibor Jager / Ramat Gan Safari Park

Born to 12-year-old Tinkerbell, the baby is strong and healthy.  Tinkerbell is proving to be a devoted mother to the baby, who was named Tuvia (a new baby’s name always begins with the first letter of the mother’s name).

Native to tropical forests in western central Africa, Mandrills are the largest of all monkey species.  Sexual dimorphism is extremely pronounced in Mandrills.  Males are about twice as large as females and feature red, purple, and light blue skin patches on their faces and rumps.  As Tuvia grows, he will gain the bright colors of an adult male, but for now he is more drably colored like his mother.

Mandrills are listed as Vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.  Major threats include deforestation and hunting for bushmeat.  Some zoo-born Mandrills have been successfully reintroduced into the wild.

See more pictures of Tuvia below.

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First Day of Spring Brings New Baby Mandrill to Jacksonville Zoo


The Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens announced the birth of a Mandrill born on March 20 to 16-year-old dam Deanna, and 17-year-old sire Douglas. The gender of the infant is not yet known. Mother and infant are doing very well, and the baby appears strong and healthy. This marks the fourth offspring for Deanna and brings Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens’ mandrill collection to a total of five animals.

Kumani, another female offspring of Deanna’s, is currently sharing the living space with her mother and the newest addition and is gaining valuable experience by observing maternal behavior. Deanna and the little one were officially introduced to the public on March 23. From now on, they will rotate on and off exhibit with mandrills Douglas and Gucci.

Mandrills are the largest of all monkeys. Shy and reclusive, these primates are found only in African equatorial rain forests. They can easily be identified by their colorful blue and red facial markings and their bright pinkish-red behinds. Mandrills are threatened. Considered a delicacy by many Africans, they are hunted as bushmeat. In additon, the increase in the use of land for agriculture and human settlement is shrinking the rain forest they call home.


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Photo Credit: Mark Sheppe/Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens

Little Mandrill Girl Greets the World

This past October Australia's Adelaide Zoo welcomed a newborn female Mandrill to first time mother Niari. Adelaide Zoo’s Mandrills have not bred in a number of years but first time mom Niari is reportedly doing quite well with her little one. To date no keeper assistance has been needed, which can be the case with some first time mothers. The baby is almost two months old now and can be seen throughout the exhibit riding along with Mom, suckling, and starting to explore her surroundings. Although inquisitive she still stays close to Niari.

Baby Mandrill Adelaide Zoo 1

Baby Mandrill Adelaide Zoo 1

The Mandrill is the world's largest species of monkey and is found in the tropical rainforests and occasionally woodlands of southern Cameroon, Gabon, Equatorial Guinea, and Congo.  Mandrills are listed as vulnerable as a result of intensive hunting pressure and habitat loss across their native region.

Baby Mandrill Adelaide Zoo 2

Baby Mandrill Adelaide Zoo 4Photo credits: David Mattner for Zoos South Australia

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