London Zoo

Baby Sloth Cuddles With Furry Friend

Sloth baby bottle feed at ZSL London Zoo - July 2015 (c)ZSL
A baby Two-toed Sloth at the London Zoo has two special friends:  a zoo keeper and a stuffed toy Sloth to cuddle with.Yawning sloth baby at ZSL London Zoo - July 2015 (c)ZSL

Sloth baby on toy sloth at ZSL London Zoo - July 2015 (c)ZSLPhoto Credit:  ZSL London Zoo
The baby, born in June to second-time parents Marilyn and Leander, needed a helping hand when his mother stopped producing milk and was unable to care for her infant.

Keepers have named the young male Edward after the character Edward Scissorhands, due to his impressive claws, which will grow up to four inches in length and enable him to cling on and climb easily through the trees in his habitat.

To help strengthen Edward’s little limbs, keepers fitted his Sloth-teddy with carabiners so that it can be hung from a branch, enabling the youngster to cling the same way he would with mom.

Edward gets a bottle of goat’s milk every three hours, but, befitting the notoriously slow nature of Sloths, keepers sometimes have to wait for him to stir from a deep slumber before feeding can begin.  When Edward is hungry, he lets keepers know by emitting a loud, sneeze-like squeak.

Detailed records are maintained on everything the infant does, including eating , sleeping, and even Edward’s potty-habits. Sloths leave their high tree-top habitats only once a week to go to the toilet, so by keeping track of his poop, Edward’s keepers can account for any weight losses or gains.

Two-toed Sloths are slow-moving, tree-dwelling, nocturnal herbivores, found in tropical forests in Central and South America. Sloths are strong swimmers and can drop from a tree branch into a river to swim across it. When sleeping, Sloths often curl up in a ball in the fork of a tree.


‘Forrest’ the Kinkajou at London Zoo

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ZSL London Zoo has welcomed an adorable Kinkajou, named “Forrest”!

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ZSL_Kinkajou_3Photo Credits: ZSL London Zoo

Arriving from Scotland, Forrest is only 6-months-old and was hand-reared by his previous keepers. At the moment, the little guy is feeling a little shy around his new home, but keepers have been giving him lots of attention to help him settle, including lots of his favorite figs and peaches.

Kinkajous originate from Central and South America, living in tropical rainforests. They’re omnivores, meaning they eat both meat and plants, so Forrest is happy eating anything from small mammals, to tasty bits of fruit.

In the wild, Kinkajous also enjoy sipping at nectar, which they get with their long tongues. These tongues aren’t their only useful appendage. Kinkajous possess amazing tails that measure out longer than their head and body. These tails are also prehensile, meaning they can be used to hang upside down from branches of trees.

Keepers have already started encouraging this natural behavior as a form of enrichment. It’s hoped that when Forrest overcomes his stage fright, he’ll be able to show off this amazing behavior in the zoo’s Animals in Action demonstrations. However, for now, Forrest is quite happy using his cute little face to get more figs and peaches.

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Surprise Sloth Baby Is a London Zoo First!

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ZSL London Zoo has welcomed its first ever baby Sloth, after a very surprise pregnancy.

Zookeepers were dealt a huge surprise in the Rainforest Life exhibit when female Sloth Marilyn was found to be pregnant – as they didn’t even know the male and female had mated.

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10498678_524835967552866_890713677474636574_oPhoto credit: Paul Boyd

 

Male Leander arrived from Germany at the end of 2012 to be paired with ZSL London Zoo’s resident female Marilyn, but despite their ploys to get the pair together, keepers had no idea that the sloths had even acknowledged one another, let alone successfully mated.

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Tiny Snails Are a Big Deal For Conservation

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Partula Hebe is one of eleven Snail species that have been extinct in the wild for over 20 years and have only survived due to an international zoo breeding program. The same zoo community, in close collaboration with the French Polynesian Government, has led a field conservation initiative to re-establish these endemic Snails back to their island homes. The Partulid Action Plan aims to reintroduce all surviving species to their island homes by the end of the decade. Bristol Zoo Gardens, ZSL, Edinburgh, Chester and Marwell Wildlife are some of the zoos involved in helping conserve this species.

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Photo credit: ZSL London Zoo

These amazing images show an adult Partula Hebe Bella Snail sharing a special edition Darwin £2 coin with its 3-week-old baby at ZSL London Zoo. The species is one of 10 highlighted by the British and Irish Association of Zoos and Aquariums (BIAZA) as owing its survival to zoos. 


Wobbly Little Langur Monkey Steps Outside With Mom

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There’s a bright new addition at ZSL London Zoo – a neon orange baby monkey. And Zooborns first introduced you to the baby HERE.

Keepers at the Zoo were delighted when first-time mum Lu Lu, a rare Francois Langur, gave birth to the flame-haired baby in early September. Baby Tango's hair will gradually become black like Mom and Dad's when the baby is about six months old. In the mean time, it makes the baby even easier to see when out in their habitat.

Francois Langurs are one of the world’s rarest monkeys, and originate from northeast Vietnam and China. Classed as critically endangered, their populations are declining rapidly because of habitat loss.

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Photo Credit: ZSL London Zoo


Flame-Haired Baby Langur for London Zoo

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First-time mom Lu Lu, a rare Francois Langur, gave birth to a brilliant red-haired baby on September 1 at the London Zoo. Lu Lu and dad Neo have dark black fur. The baby, who is named Tango, is covered head-to-toe in bright orange fur, making it quite tricky to see the family resemblance.

Zookeeper Kathryn Sanders said: “Baby Tango is currently rocking the redhead look, but it won’t actually be ginger for very long.” She added: “Its fur will begin to darken at around three months of age, and they are usually completely black by the time they reach six months old.”

The yet-to-be sexed youngster spends most of its time snuggled up to mum, but in the same way the females behave in the wild, “auntie” Lee Lee also helps out with babysitting duties. Francois Langurs are one of the world’s rarest monkeys, and originate from northeast Vietnam and China. Classed as critically endangered, their populations are declining rapidly because of habitat loss.

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Photo Credits: London Zoo


 


Big Steps for "Tiny" the Baby Gorilla

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He’s been nicknamed "Tiny" by zookeepers, but ZSL London Zoo’s male Gorilla baby is now taking his first big steps. Thrilled zookeepers captured the moment on camera when the three-month-old youngster left his mother’s side for the first time to explore his Gorilla Kingdom home. Tiny, who has clung to his mother, 12-year-old Mjukuu, since birth, was urged on by her as he stumbled and crawled around the gorilla enclosure - much to the delight of his keepers. Under the watchful eyes of ‘Aunty’ Gorilla Zaire, 36, and Effie, 17, the baby made his way back to his mum, only to be gently pushed away and encouraged to continue his new adventure.

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London Zoo's Newest Arrival is in Good Hands

London Zoo's first-time mother Mjukuu gave birth to the healthy baby gorilla on the afternoon of October 26th, following a straightforward labour, which was closely monitored by the Zoo’s vets and keepers. Zoological director David Field said: “Mother and baby are both doing brilliantly, although it’s still early days. ‘Aunties’ Zaire and Effie were at the birth and have remained with Mjukuu throughout.” Staff at ZSL London Zoo will now begin the sensitive process of introducing the newborn to his stepfather Kesho. Introducing the baby to Kesho is not without its risks, however staff are making every effort to assist a smooth introduction and hopefully ensure the gorillas form a cohesive family group.

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Photo Credits: Dan Sprawson / ZSL London Zoo


Monkey Mix-Up at the London Zoo

A mixed-up monkey is confusing visitors at ZSL London Zoo after taking a shine to another species’ baby. Maternal Juanita, a golden-headed lion tamarin, has adopted an emperor tamarin baby - much to the surprise of zookeepers.

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The surrogate mum, who jumps around the zoo’s Rainforest Life exhibit with the two-month-old baby on her back, started taking an interest in her neighbours’ baby just weeks after it was born. The baby emperor tamarin, who is grey and already sporting the start of an adult’s signature white moustache, was first seen clinging on to Juanita’s fiery orange mane, a month after it was born. Emperor tamarins, native to South America, are usually brought up by their fathers who carry them until they are old enough to fend for themselves.

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Senior keeper, Lucy Hawley, said: “At first the father of the emperor tamarin baby was a little nervous about Juanita – but now they all seem to get along just fine. “Juanita has never had a baby before so it seems like her mothering instinct has just kicked in this time around… who knows what animal she’ll be carrying around next.”

Tamarin surrogate london zoo 3cPhoto credits: Zoological Society of London