Langur Monkey

London Zoo Welcomes First Birth at New Exhibit

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Zookeepers at ZSL London Zoo are celebrating the arrival of the first Hanuman Langur born at the Zoo’s Land of the Lions exhibit.

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4_Hanuman langur birth (c) ZSL (3)Photo Credits: ZSL London Zoo

Born to first-time parents Saffron and Rex after a 200-day gestation, the tiny female Hanuman Langur was spotted by zookeepers early in the morning on July 23.

Zookeeper Agnes Kiss said, “The first Hanuman Langur to be born to this troop at ZSL London Zoo and the first new arrival at Land of the Lions, this tiny primate is an exciting symbol of the success of this project.”

“To mark the occasion we’ve called her, Kamala, which means ‘lotus flower’ in Gujarati – the sign of beauty, fertility and prosperity.”

“Everyone is very pleased with Kamala’s progress so far,” said Agnes. “At the moment she has a pale face and downy dark fur, but it won’t be long before her skin turns black and her coat thickens and turns a magnificent silver - just like her parents.”

“She’ll also grow into her large ears, which are perfect for picking up subtle noises over long distances; in the Gir National Park, Hanuman Langurs act as an early warning system for other wildlife – making loud ‘barks’ from high in the treetops to warn of a lion’s approach. In Land of the Lions, the troop can often be heard vocalizing in response to the lions’ roars, which Kamala will learn how to do from her parents.”

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Ripley is Amazing: “Believe It or Not!”

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It’s a birth for the record books at the Memphis Zoo! A male François’ Langur was born to mom, Tanah, and dad, Jay Jay, on April 12.

According to the François’ Langur Species Survival Plan (SSP), the leading authority on the total François’ Langur population, 22-year-old Tanah is the oldest Langur in captivity to give birth. In honor of this record-breaking fact, the new infant has been named Ripley...a nod to the quintessential purveyor of amazing facts: “Ripley’s Believe It or Not!”.

“This is our third François' Langur birth in three years,” said Courtney Janney, Curator of Large Mammals. “These animals live in social groups, and their young are raised communally. Tanah is taking very good care of him, but sisters Jean Grey and Raven spend a lot of time helping out by carrying him around!”

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Visitors to the Memphis Zoo’s François’ Langur exhibit will be able to spot little Ripley quite easily. When they’re born, Langur infants are bright orange. As they get older, their orange slowly fades into the black coat that all adults have.

Ripley and his parents are currently on exhibit, along with sisters: Raven, Rook, and Jean Grey.

The François' Langur (Trachypithecus francoisi), also known as the Francois' Leaf Monkey, Tonkin Leaf Monkey, or White Side-burned Black Langur, is a species of lutung belonging to the Colobinae subfamily.

The species is a native of Southwestern China to northeastern Vietnam. The species is named after Auguste François (1857–1935), who was the French Consul at Lungchow in southern China.

The François' Langur is currently classified as “Endangered” on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. The population has been on a steady decline for the past 30 years. Of the many factors threatening their survival, hunting has had the largest impact.

The Memphis Zoo has housed François’ Langurs since 2002.

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New Langur Is Lucky Number Seven for Parents

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A bright orange, endangered Francois’ Langur was born February 6 at Lincoln Park Zoo and is now on exhibit at Helen Brach Primate House.

The infant is the seventh successful offspring for Lincoln Park Zoo’s breeding pair, Pumpkin (dam) and Cartman (sire), and a part of the Francois’ Langur Species Survival Plan ® (SSP), which cooperatively manages the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) accredited-zoo population. Lead Keeper Bonnie Jacobs serves as Vice-Chair of the Francois’ Langur SSP and has been managing the studbook for this population in the AZA for the past 15 years.

The sex and measurements of the infant are yet to be determined, as the newborn is still clinging tight to mom.

“Pumpkin is an experienced and attentive mother and the entire troop is being supportive,” said Curator of Primates, Maureen Leahy. “We recently updated the Langur exhibit to include more dynamic elements such as vines, sway poles and pulley feeders, so it will be exciting to see the newest addition of the troop grow more independent and explore the habitat.”

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4_20170107_JF_Francois_Langur-7Photo Credits: Julia Fuller / Lincoln Park Zoo

Francois’ Langurs (Trachypithecus francoisi) are classified as “Endangered” on the IUCN Red List due to habitat degradation and hunting. They’re native to the southern Guangxi province of China, northern Vietnam and west-central Laos.

Adults display black body coloration with a white marking from ear-to-ear and a black crest atop the head. Infants are born with a bright orange hue, which scientists believe encourages alloparenting, or ‘aunting behavior,’ among females in the group. Infants’ fur turns black within the first three to six months of life.

With its parents, the Langur infant joins sisters Kieu and Orla, brothers Vinh and Pierre, and adult female Chi on exhibit at Helen Brach Primate House, open daily from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Lincoln Park Zoo. For more information, visit www.lpzoo.org .


Bright Orange Babies Join Columbus Zoo's Langur Troop

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The Columbus Zoo and Aquarium started off the new year with a pair of bright orange babies:  Two Silvered Leaf Langurs were born December 1 and January 11, with the latest being the zoo’s first birth of the new year.

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Langur 6845 - Grahm S. Jones, Columbus Zoo and AquariumPhoto Credit:  Grahm S. Jones
 

These births also mark the Columbus Zoo’s first Langur babies since 2011, and the first time two infants were born in a troop since 2010.

Langurs, which have black fur with silvered tips as adults, are born with bright orange fur. This marked difference in coat color is believed to encourage other female Langurs to assist in raising the young, a practice called allomothering.

The births are also important for the breeding recommendations outlined by the Species Survival Plan (SSP), a program coordinated by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) to manage threatened or endangered species.  Silvered Leaf Langurs are listed as Near Threatened by the International Union for Conservation of Nature due to population declines caused by habitat loss. These two babies will help to sustain the langur population among AZA-accredited zoos. 

Patty, age 16, gave birth December 1 to her fifth offspring, who has since been determined to be a girl. Gumby, age 14, gave birth to her sixth offspring, the gender of which has not yet been determined, on January 11. Both mothers mated with Thai, who is 4.5 years old, and are experienced caregivers.

Neither baby has been named yet.  Young Langurs begin to sit and walk on their own after about two weeks.  The babies’ orange fur will gradually be replaced by silvery fur by the time they are six months old.  The older of the two babies is already showing signs of graying in her face, hands, and tail.

The range of the Silvered Leaf Langur includes Brunei, Indonesia, and Malaysia. Wild populations are losing their habitats as lands are cleared for oil palm plantations or destroyed by forest fires. Langurs are also hunted for their meat or captured to serve as pets.

See more photos of the babies below.

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Bright Orange Leaf Monkey Born at Taronga

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Taronga Zoo is celebrating the birth of a bright orange Francois’ Langur, one of the world’s rarest monkeys.

The male infant, whom keepers have named ‘Nangua’ after the Mandarin word for pumpkin, was discovered cradled in mother Meili’s arms on 7 November.

Also known as Francois’ leaf monkeys, Langurs are born with bright orange hair while their parents are black in color. It is thought this color distinction makes it easier for adults to identify and look after infants.

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Senior Primate Keeper, Jane Marshall said Nangua was already receiving lots of attention from his mother and the harem group’s other females, Noel and Elke.

“Meili has shown her calmness and experience since the birth, cradling and protecting the baby, but also allowing Noel and Elke to get close to him,” said Jane.

Francois’ Langurs practice allomothering or ‘auntying’, in which other females participate in raising the baby. Infants can often be seen being passed around as each of the Langurs take turns caring for their newest addition.

“Noel has taken on the role of allomother, carrying the baby about 50 percent of the time. This gives mum a break to eat and rest, but as soon as the baby whimpers she races straight back over to him,” said Jane.

Nangua has begun to explore his exhibit on Taronga’s Rainforest Trail to the delight of keen-eyed visitors.

Once widespread in China and Vietnam, Francois’ Langurs have become one of the world’s rarest monkeys due to habitat loss and poaching for traditional medicines. Taronga is the only zoo in Australia to care for these primates, but is working with other zoos globally to help ensure a future for the species.


Twinkle, Twinkle ‘Little Star’ at Belfast Zoo

(1)  Belfast Zoo has welcomed a ‘little star’ to the family.  On 23 August 2014, Chi the Francois’ langur, gave birth to a small but healthy infant.

Belfast Zoo has welcomed a ‘little star’ to their family.  On August 23, 2014, Chi, the Francois’ Langur, gave birth to a small but healthy infant. The diminutive male was recently given the name ‘Xiao Xing’ which means ‘little star’ in Chinese.

(2)  The small monkey was rejected by his mother at birth, at which point zoo curator, Andrew Hope, intervened to care for the young infant.

(3)  Andrew has been instrumental in hand-rearing the langur, taking him home to ensure 24 hour care and regular feeding every few hours.

(4)  Children from the British International School of Shanghai  were given the challenge of coming up with a Chinese name for the little monkey.Photo Credits: Belfast Zoo

The small monkey was rejected by his mother at birth. Zoo curator, Andrew Hope, intervened to care for the young infant langur. Mr. Hope explains, “There are occasions where first time mothers just do not have the skill set or the instinct to care for their young. This is fairly common in many species.  After monitoring the mother and baby, it quickly became clear that we needed to become involved.”

Since then, Andrew has been instrumental in hand-rearing the tiny Francois’ Langur, taking him home to ensure 24 hour care and regular feeding every few hours.

Andrew continues “There have been a lot of sleepless nights and countless bottles but it has been so rewarding to see his progress.  Francois’ Langurs are a species close to my heart.  I am the studbook keeper for these langurs, which means that I coordinate the genetic and reproductive management of the captive population living in the seven European zoos privileged to keep this endangered species.  In early 2014, I made the arduous climb of Mount Kilimanjaro to raise awareness for a number of conservation campaigns, including the Guanxi Francois’ Langur conservation action plan.  Francois’ Langurs are facing a high risk of extinction due to habitat destruction, increased agriculture, warfare, logging and they are also hunted as food, for medicine and for the pet trade.  In 2003, there were estimated to be less than 500 langurs in Vietnam and only approximately 1400 in China.  It has been a pleasure to play such an active role in the conservation of this species especially as our ‘little star’ is really starting to develop a personality and become much more adventurous!”

Francois’ Langurs are found in the tropical forests and limestone hills of China, Vietnam and Laos.  For this reason, contact was made with the British International School of Shanghai, Pudong Campus.  The children were given the challenge of coming up with a Chinese name for the little monkey. 

Nicola Howard, head of the middle school, said “The winning name that the pupils decided on was a suggestion by year six student, Marguerite Girard.  Marguerite’s name was ‘Xiao Xing’ which means ‘little star’.  The staff and students of the middle school are delighted to have had the opportunity to name Xiao Xing and are looking forward to regular updates.  We also hope to continue our support of the species by fundraising for conservation campaigns.”

See more photos, and read more about Xiao Xing below the fold!

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Giants Fans: San Francisco Zoo Has a New "Rally" Baby!

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A black and orange baby arrived at the San Francisco Zoo in synch with the baseball Giants' playoff success. The good luck baby is a female Francois' Langur Monkey. She is the 17th of her kind to be born at the zoo since 1985. San Fransisco is one of the most successful zoos at breeding this rare monkey, of which only around 2000 remain in the wild.

Parenting duties are shared amongst females in the Langur group. This gives mom a break and allows the infant's aunts and sisters to gain valuable mothering experience. The baby will remain orange and black for the next three to sixth months.

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Photo credit: Marianne Hale / SF Zoo

 

 


That Baby's Bright! Javan Langur Born at Howletts

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Howletts Wild Animal Park has officially welcomed a bright new addition to their Javan Langur Monkey group. These are the first pictures of the adorable apricot infant, born last month and named Malang. Head Primate Keeper Matt Ford said: "Malang is doing very well and it’s great to see her out and about with the family group."

Javan Langurs are listed as a vulnerable species on the IUCN Red list of endangered species and they face the same threats as other primates in Asia, including loss of habitat and hunting. The brightly colored primates are not often seen in wild animal parks but Howletts and Port Lympne are collectively home to over 50 individuals. Animal Director, Neil Spooner said: ‘We have one of the largest collections of Javan Langurs outside Indonesia and have had over 100 births since the early 1980’s. Our Javan Primate Project just outside MaIang, Indonesia launched at the end of last year. The conservation project is rescuing primates from the illegal pet trade and rehabilitating them, so that they can be reintroduced  to areas of the wild that we protect – Malang is a very fitting name for our latest langur birth."

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Photo Credit: Dave Rolfe/Howletts Wild Animal Park

Read more about the Langur's coloring below the jump:

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Seeing Double? Second Little Ginger-haired Langur Baby Born at Santa Ana Zoo

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The Santa Ana Zoo in California was delighted by the birth of their second Silvery Langur (Trachypithecus cristatus) this year. Born on the February 22, the baby and its parents, Ripley and Oliver, are doing just fine. This bright orange baby monkey joins the Zoo’s other baby Langur, who was born on January 31 (as covered by ZooBorns)!  Both babies share the same father but have different moms.

“Visitors have been flabbergasted to see two orange babies instead of one,” says Kent Yamaguchi, Zoo Director. The January tyke has already started to venture away from its mother... and has been seen investigating this new addition to the family. Zoos are important places where people can learn about the need to conserve these amazing creatures."

Silvery Langur monkeys are born bright orange and turn silver-gray starting at about three to five months old. Mature Silvery Langurs weigh around 15 pounds when fully grown. In the wild, this monkey lives in the tropical forests of Indonesia and Malaysia where they are threatened by deforestation.

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Photo Credits: Photo 1, 3, 4: Ethan Fischer, Photo 2, Dina Orbison

Read more about Silvery Langurs after the jump!

Continue reading "Seeing Double? Second Little Ginger-haired Langur Baby Born at Santa Ana Zoo" »


Silvery Langur Baby Swings Into Santa Ana Zoo

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The Santa Ana Zoo in Prentice Park is pleased to announce the birth of a Silvery Langur (Trachypithecus cristatus) on the 31st of January, 2012. The proud parents are Oliver and Daria. The yet to be named baby is the second offspring of this pair. Mom, dad and baby can be found at home in the primate area at the zoo.

Bright orange at birth with pale skin, over the first three to five months of life Silvery Langurs change to a grayish coat with a darker face and hands, and eventually weigh up to fifteen pounds.  Silvery Langurs are at home in the dense tropical forests of Indonesia and Malaysia where they are considered near threatened with a decreasing population mostly due to land clearance, often for palm oil plantations. Silvery Langurs are specialist leaf eaters with a digestive system adapted to ferment the tough cellulose material in leaves.  With a diet high in vegetation, Langurs will sit quietly for many hours digesting their food.   

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Photo credits: Ethan Fisher

The Santa Ana Zoo has housed Silvery Langurs since 1984, and holds the longevity record for this species with a female reaching over 35 years of age.  This birth at the Santa Ana Zoo and was a collaborative effort with Species Survival Plan Program through the Association of Zoos and Aquariums.  The mission of the AZA Species Survival Plan Programs is to manage and conserve select threatened or endangered, ex situ populations through the cooperation of AZA-accredited Zoos and Aquariums.

The new baby is on view for the public daily between 10:00AM and 4:00PM at the Santa Ana Zoo in Prentice Park, 1801 Chestnut Avenue, Santa Ana, CA 92701.