Kangaroo & Wallaby

Lincoln Children's Zoo Hand-raises Baby Tammar Wallaby

984150_10152118771361160_3104676862819477910_n

A seven-month-old Tammar Wallaby joey is one of the newest additions to the Lincoln Children's Zoo. Liv the Wallaby joey was found out of her mother's pouch one morning and was immediately rescued by zookeepers. Still being hand-raised, Liv is carried in a make-shift pouch to substitute the body warmth and shelter provided by a Wallaby mother's pouch.

"Lincoln Children's Zoo is one of the only zoos that has hand-raised this specific species of Wallaby in the United States," president & CEO, John Chapo said. "It's a time consuming effort. The zookeeepers were feeding her eight times a day, adjusting the formula to provide the accurate amount of fat content a mother would supply and getting it switched over to solid food."

10426859_10152118772381160_4015920501518436616_n

10500388_10152118770761160_8574018669642722287_n

10513282_10152118768861160_96098761496259367_n

10389131_10152118769571160_6744115000883769349_n

10456800_10152118770121160_2611480631561805311_n

"Normally Liv would be in her mother's pouch for nine months of her life, but we have experienced her growth and development one-on-one from the beginning," said Taylor Daniels, one of the zookeepers caring for Liv at Lincoln Children's Zoo. "Seeing Liv throughout all stages of her life and getting to know her personality has been incredible."
 
Wallabies and Kangaroos are Marsupials, but Wallabies are generally much smaller than Kangaroos. Tammar Wallabies are the smallest species of Wallaby. Lincoln Children's Zoo now has six Tammar Wallabies, including Liv, as well as two Bennett's wallabies.
 
Liv is still too young to join the zoo's other Wallabies, but zoo visitors will be able to see Liv when she begins making appearances on the Animal Encounter Stage in early July. Lincoln Children's Zoo's Animal Encounter Stage features different animals for children to interact with and discover first-hand every day.


Wallaby Joey Gets a Helping Hand at Taronga Zoo

10373818_737052079691019_2065847754256256766_n
A Swamp Wallaby who was rejected by her mother is being cared for by zoo keepers at Australia’s Taronga Zoo.

Swamp Wallaby joey 3 June 2014 (3)CROP
Swamp Wallaby joey 3 June 2014 (16)CROP
Swamp Wallaby joey 3 June 2014 (40)cropPhoto Credit:  Taronga Zoo

The six-month-old female joey was found separated from her mother in the zoo’s Wallaby exhibit.  Keepers’ attempts to reunite the joey, named Mirrawa, with her mother were unsuccessful, so they took on the job of caring for the joey.

Mirrawa is currently being fed milk developed specifically for Wallabies.  She’s just beginning to chew on soft new growth leaves of a few native plants, such as bottlebrush.

Keepers will care for Mirrawa until she is about eight months old.  At that time, she’ll be reintroduced to the exhibit, where she will live among the Wallaby group.

Swamp Wallabies are common in the forests and scrublands of easternmost Australia.  They emerge at night to feed on a wide variety of plants.  

See more photos of Mirrawa below.

Continue reading "Wallaby Joey Gets a Helping Hand at Taronga Zoo" »


Roger Williams Park Zoo Welcomes Endangered Tree Kangaroo

6a010535647bf3970b01a73dc86be0970d-800wi

Roger Williams Park Zoo in Rhode Island has just announced the birth of a Matschie’s Tree Kangaroo, born in October last year. The female joey, named Holly, is the first tree kangaroo birth at the zoo in over 20 years, and one of only one of three born in captivity in the U.S. last year.

Tree Kangaroos are an Endangered species, and are part of a Species Survival Program – a cooperative breeding program through the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) that aims to rehabilitate endangered and threatened species populations.

6a010535647bf3970b01a3fd0d8d29970b-800wi

3 kangarooPhoto credit: Roger Williams Park Zoo

See video of mother and baby:

Zoo keepers discovered that the female tree kangaroo was pregnant after the announcement of the zoo’s plans to build a new tree kangaroo exhibit in the Australasia building by spring 2014.

“The first six months after birth is a critical time for both mother and baby. For this reason, we have put construction of the new exhibit on hold until late June 2014,” said Zoo Executive Director Dr. Jeremy Goodman, DVM. The exhibit will feature indoor and outdoor viewing areas with easy access for the animals between both spaces, giving guests a much improved view of the animals. Opening of the new exhibit is planned for early fall.

See and read more after the fold!

Continue reading "Roger Williams Park Zoo Welcomes Endangered Tree Kangaroo" »


Orphan Tree Kangaroos - A ZooBorns First!

Chewing leaf

Meet Kimberely and Anneli, two orphaned Lumholtz Tree Kangaroos in the care of Margit Cianelli, one of only two people licensed to rescue and rehabilitate this lesser known Australian species. Both joeys are thriving under Margit's expert care but have tough stories.

Annelli and Kimberley

On shoulder

Kimberely (the larger one) was found in a water stream after falling from the trees. Some local aboriginals swimming nearby pulled her out (saving her life) and attempted to reconnect her with her mother in the trees above. The mother however, did not show interest in the joey and hence Margit was given the joey to hand raise. Margit suspects that the mother rejected Kimberley because she is an extremely active joey and she may have been too much to deal with. It’s possible she was a first time mother.

Anneli the smaller of the two was found near a farm area motionless under a water pump. Clearly she had been separated by her mother for days as she was suffering physically being weak, malnourished and dehydrated. She was very light and when taken to the vet she was discovered to be suffering from pneumonia, septicemia and multiple infections. She was placed on an IV drip for seven days and against the odds she recovered and has transformed into a healthy young joey.

DONT MISS THIS AMAZING VIDEO

Margit has cared for over 15 Tree Kangaroos joeys in the past and is seen as a pioneer in Tree Kangaroo rehabilitation. She often has the joeys for over a year as preparing them for return to the wild is a long process. They need to be taught how to climb (this includes daily exercise in the climbing yard), they get taught what foods are safe to eat (the spaghetti is a treat), they also are nurtured and encouraged to be confident upon release.

Tree Kangaroos are a highly territorial species and finding unoccupied space can be challenging. Initially when released Margit will put radio collars on her roos and allow them to return until they have found their own territory to ensure they survive during their first few weeks in the wild.

Both Australian species of Tree Kangaroo, the Lumholtz and Bennett's, are currently under threat due to habitat fragmentation from human encroachment, car accidents and dogs whose territory they pass through while looking for new homes.

Hanging on curtain

Kimberley with leafPhoto and Video Credits: Adam Cox, Wakaleo / Creatura Channel

Want to do more to help Tree Kangaroos? Check out the nearby Tree Roo Rescue and Conservation Centre. Video of their current guests below:

)


Peekin' Out of Mom's Pouch: Meet Zoo Miami's New Kangaroo Joey

K HERO

An Endangered Matchie’s Tree Kangaroo has begun to peek out of its mother’s pouch at Zoo Miami. Though it is just now exposing itself, this joey is believed to have actually been born approximately 5 months ago.  As with most marsupials, Tree Kangaroos are born in an almost embryonic state after a pregnancy of about 44 days. The newborn is only the size of a jelly bean and slowly crawls into the mother’s pouch where it locks onto a nipple and then the majority of development takes place.

Now more fully formed, the little one is still hairless and while it peeks out of the pouch, it will stay confined there for the next several months, continuing to develop before venturing away from its mother.  It will not be totally weaned until it is around a year old. 

K mouth

K nose to nose

K mom eats
Photo Credit: Zoo Miami

Matchie’s tree kangaroos live at high elevations in the Huon Peninsula of Papua New Guinea where they spend most of their time up in trees feeding on a variety of leaves, ferns, moss, and bark.  They are believed to be solitary animals and the only strong social bond formed is between a mother and her offspring.  Both Mom and joey will remain off exhibit for several weeks to allow for proper bonding and to help facilitate a smooth introduction for this wonderful new addition!

Read more and see more pictures after the fold:

Continue reading "Peekin' Out of Mom's Pouch: Meet Zoo Miami's New Kangaroo Joey" »


Rare Albino Wallaby Joey Grows Up at Linton Zoo

Albino Red Necked Wallaby born to mum Kylie Linton Zoo (2) 26.02.13

When keepers at the United Kingdom’s Linton Zoo first saw the oddly-colored joey peeking out of Red-necked Wallaby Kylie’s pouch on February 8, they affectionately named it ALF (Alien Life Form).  But as the pale-colored joey grew, they realized its dramatic white coloring was truly stunning!  These photos show the joey’s progression from pouch-dweller to snow-white juvenile. Though the joey is now half-grown, it still tries to squeeze into its mother's pouch for a little TLC.

Albino Red Necked wallaby 18.05.19 (1)

Albino Red Necked Wallaby joey with mum Kylie 10.05.13 (8)
 
Albino Red Necked Wallaby joey with mum Kylie 10.05.13 (5)
Photo Credit:  Linton Zoo

 

Albino animals (including humans) lack pigment for coloring, which means the joey has pink eyes and white fur. Red-necked Wallabies are usually grey-brown in color, but on rare occasions, a white or albino is born, even after generations of normal-colored individuals. The Linton Zoo staff believes their Wallaby mob is descended from the group of Wallabies given as a gift to Queen Elizabeth II while she was on a state visit to Australia in 1962. This joey is the first albino Wallaby to be born at the Linton Zoo.

See more photos of the albino Wallaby joey below the fold.

Continue reading "Rare Albino Wallaby Joey Grows Up at Linton Zoo" »


Norbert the Nabarlek Becomes Perth Zoo’s Pint-sized Ambassador

Nabarlek2

A rarely-seen young Nabarlek, found curled up in his mother’s pouch after she was killed by a car, has taken up residence at Australia’s Perth Zoo.  Nabarleks are also known as Pygmy Rock Wallabies.

Named Norbert, he is the only Nabarlek in a zoo anywhere, according to the Perth Zoo.

Nabarlek3

Nabarlek4

Nabarlek1
Photo Credit:  Perth Zoo

Norbert was discovered by a wildlife rehabilitator, who provided care for several months.  At the time Norbert was taken in, he weighed just 6.5 ounces (186 grams).  Because he doesn’t have the skills to survive in the wild, Norbert was brought to the Perth Zoo where he will become a pint-sized ambassador for this little-known species.  

Perth Zoo Director of Animal Health and Research Dr. Peter Mawson said adult Nabarleks are only about 12 inches (30 cm) tall.  They are rarely seen because they inhabit remote areas and emerge only at night to feed on ferns and reeds.

Nabarleks are in the macropod family of marsupials, which includes kangaroos and wallabies.  “An interesting feature is that because of the tough nature of the plants included in their diet, the four or five molar teeth in each section of the jaw progressively move forward during the Narbalek’s life, ensuring that it is never without the teeth it needs to chew its tough food. Narbaleks are the only macropod that do this,” said Dr. Mawson.

Guests can meet Norbert starting this weekend at the Perth Zoo.

Related articles


Orphaned Red Kangaroo Joey Rescued by Taronga Western Plains Zoo

Wildlife Hospital_Red Kangaroo joey (1)

Workers at the Taronga Western Plains Zoo in Australia are currently hand raising a Red Kangaroo joey after it was found orphaned in the wild. The little joey was brought to the zoo's Wildlife Hospital where veterinarians examined the youngster to ensure its health. It was then assigned a vet nurse who will act as a surrogate mother. This surrogate will help the joey thrive and grow for the next few months until it is ready to be released back into the wild.

Wildlife Hospital_Red Kangaroo joey (2)

Wildlife Hospital_Red Kangaroo joey (3)
Photo Credit: Taronga Zoo

The Red Kangaroo, endemic to Australia like all kangaroos, is the largest mammal found on the Australian continent. The species is very abundant across the majority of the country and is currently listed as a species of "least concern" by the IUCN.


Meet Jarrah the Quokka Joey from Taronga Zoo

Joey 1

Jarrah is a six-month-old Quokka joey being hand-raised at Taronga Zoo by Keeper Kristal. Kristal was delighted to become a surrogate mum after the youngster left its mother’s pouch too early. At this age, the joey is tiny and needs full time care. 

For the next few months, wherever Kristal goes Jarrah will go too. By day Jarrah stays in a specially set-up nursery with a bag that mimics a pouch which the youngster can hop in and out of. While Kristal is doing office work, Jarrah likes to be extra close, curling up near Kristal’s chest. This makes little Jarrah feel extra secure.

Joey nose

Joey stand

Joey 2

Photo Credit: Taronga Zoo

Read about Jarrah's nighttime care, and see more pictures, after the fold:

Continue reading "Meet Jarrah the Quokka Joey from Taronga Zoo" »


Kangaroo Joeys Think Outside the Pouch at Brookfield Zoo

Kangaroo Joey-5

Two Western Grey Kangaroos born at Brookfield Zoo have been spending time outside their mothers’ pouches exploring their outdoor habitat. The young Kangaroos, called joeys, were born on February 20 and March 13 of last year to moms Daisy, 7½, and Sheila, 11.

Kangaroo Joey-8

Kangaroo Joey-1

Kangaroo Joey-2
Photo Credit: Jim Schulz/Chicago Zoological Society
 

The 10- and 11-month-old joeys only recently began hopping around and exploring their surroundings. They spent the first several months of life tucked into their mothers’ pouches, where they nursed and grew.  They will continue to nurse until they are 18 months old.  Of course by then, they’ll no longer be able to fit in the pouch.

At birth, a joey is extremely underdeveloped and is about the size of a jellybean. During this early stage of development, a mother produces low-fat milk for her young, and as a joey gets older and ventures out of the pouch, the milk becomes high in fat. A truly amazing attribute of this species is that if a mother Kangaroo is nursing a newly born joey and a juvenile already out of the pouch, she has the ability to produce both low-fat milk and high-fat milk at the same time.

Western Grey Kangaroos are one of 60 species of Kangaroos and Wallabies, all of which are native to Australia.