Columbus Zoo and Aquarium

Tiny Primate Has a Really Tiny Baby at Columbus Zoo

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A very tiny primate at the Columbus Zoo had a very tiny baby on June 9!  Pygmy Slow Lorises weigh only one pound as adults, and their babies weigh only a few ounces but are born fully-developed and with eyes wide open.

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11428237_10152971562502106_5357639955651629422_oPhoto Credit:  Columbus Zoo

First-time parents Gouda and Muenster were paired through the Association of Zoos and Aquariums’ Species Survival Plan.  The baby’s gender is not yet known, but it is already climbing with mom Gouda in the zoo’s nocturnal house. 

These little Lorises are not monkeys, but belong to a group of primates called prosimians.  Prosimians include Lemurs, Lorises, Aye-ayes, and Tarsiers.  Slow Lorises produce a toxin from scent glands on their elbows.  When alarmed, they lick the scent glands so the toxin becomes mixed with their saliva, rendering bite from these animals dangerous.

During the day, Pygmy Slow Lorises sleep curled up in the treetops. At night, they emerge to forage for leaves, fruits, and insects.

Pygmy Slow Lorises are native to southeast Asia, including Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. Their habitat was devastated during the Vietnam War, and they are listed as Vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.  


Tiger Trio Boosts Endangered Species

11174275_10152848601202106_7914475494008818571_oThree Tiger cubs born April 21 at theColumbus Zoo & Aquarium bring hope to the critically endangered Amur Tiger population.

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Photo Credit:  Columbus Zoo & Aquarium

The trio, all males, each weighed about 2.5 pounds at birth.   They are the first litter for female Irisa.  Zoo staff spent the first day closely monitoring Irisa and her newborns via a remote camera system.  When it became clear that Irisa was not nursing her cubs, the zoo staff decided to hand-rear these important youngsters.

There are only about 400 Amur Tigers (formerly called Siberian Tigers) remaining in Russia’s Far East, making each zoo-born cub extremely important to the genetic diversity of the species.  The wild population once dipped as low as 40 animals in the 1940s, but improved law enforcement and conservation programs have boosted the population in recent decades.  Poaching continues to be the number one threat to these magnificent cats, which are the largest of the six surviving Tiger subspecies.  Three Tiger subspecies have gone extinct in the last 100 years.

The Columbus Zoo participates in the Species Survival Plan for Amur Tigers, which aims to sustain a genetically healthy population of these rare cats.

 


Penguins Hatch at Columbus Zoo

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The Columbus Zoo and Aquarium in Ohio has welcomed three Humboldt Penguins to the zoo’s Shores region. The chicks hatched in March and are three of over 20 Humboldt Penguins to hatch at the zoo since 1996.  

Although animal care staff can tell the chicks apart by personality, they will place a colored wing band on the chicks to easily identify them as they start to explore their habitat. All three chicks are doing well and have passed their wellness check-up with flying colors.

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8 penguinPhoto credit: Colombus Zoo

The first to hatch weighed 85 grams, the second weighed 79 grams and the third chick, which hatched last, week weighed in at 56 grams. The first two chicks are males, but the third chick’s sex has yet to be determined.

See and read more after the fold.

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UPDATE! Columbus Zoo Baby Gorilla Gets Name

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The baby Gorilla born on May 23 at the Columbus Zoo now has a name! He is called Kamoli (pronounced Kam-aw-lee) and he looks pretty happy about that! Since first-time mom Kambera didn't seem to be a natural at mothering skills, the zoo's animal care experts have been raising him, providing the around-the-clock care and nurturing that he needed to grow and become healthy and strong. His keepers spend quite a bit of time near Kambera with the hope of being able to reunite Kamoli with her in the near future. Stay tuned.

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Photo Credit: Grahm S. Jones, Columbus Zoo and Aquarium

The baby continues to thrive and now you can see him in action in the video below: 

ZooBorns first covered the story of his birth HERE on June 10, where you can see his early pictures and learn more. See more pictures of baby Kamoli after the fold:

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Boy oh Boy! Baby Gorilla Born at Columbus Zoo

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There's a lot of excitement at Ohio's Columbus Zoo over a brand new baby Gorilla, born on May 23, to Gorilla parents Kambera and  Oliver. The little one arrived at  at 3:22 a.m., weighing 5 pounds, a healthy weight for a newborn Gorilla. And it's a boy!

Kambera, being a first-time mom, displayed a lack of maternal skills, so the zoo's animal care experts are raising him in an environment that provides around-the-clock care and nurturing. They spend a significant amount of time close to Kambera with the hope of being able to reunite the baby with her in the near future. The baby has clearly done very well and is bright-eyed, healthy and energetic. Visitors can now see him daily from noon to 3 p.m. in the indoor Gorilla yard.

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Photo Credit: Columbus Zoo

Gorillas live in moist tropical forests, or along the edge of forests, near clearings with an abundance of low, edible vegetation. Mountain gorillas range up into cloud forests.

Female gorillas reach maturity at seven or eight years old, but they usually don't breed until they reach ten plus years. Wild males tend to not breed before they are 15 years old, because there is greater competition between males to get with females.  Gestation is close to human timing, taking about about eight and a half months, usually resulting in one baby. Babies can begin to walk around within three to six months, but take up until about three years old to be fully weaned. Zoo Gorillas may reach sexual maturity earlier, and have babies more often than they do in the wild.

Gorillas also tend to live much longer in zoos -- up to their mid-fifties compared to the mid-thirties in the wild. Western Lowland and Cross River Gorillas are listed as critically endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Eastern Lowland and Mountain Gorillas are listed as Endangered on the Red List.

 


World's Oldest Gorilla Celebrates Birthday at Columbus Zoo

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Meet Colo, the world’s oldest known Gorilla. Born December 22, 1956 at the Columbus Zoo & Aquarium, Colo was the first of her kind ever born at a zoo. In fact, it would be another five years until a second Lowland Gorilla was born at a zoo and a further five years for a third.

For Colo’s 56th birthday this weekend, the Columbus Zoo presented her with a specially prepared cake and presents that included her favorite food... tomatoes!  Guests joined in on the fun by singing happy birthday to her, along with the staff.

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Now, at 56 years old, Colo has also broken the longevity record previously held by Jenny at the Dallas Zoo, who died at age 55 in 2008. And, in 1983, her grandsons were the first twin Gorillas born in the western hemisphere.

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All in all, Colo is the mother of three, grandmother of 16, great grandmother of seven and great great grandmother of two! Colo had three babies, Emmy, Oscar and Toni. Emmy was the first second-generation Gorilla born in a zoo and Toni gave birth to Cora, who was the first third-generation Gorilla born in a zoo. 

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Photo Credit: Columbus Zoo & Aquarium

There are currently 15 endangered Lowland Gorillas at the Columbus Zoo & Aquarium including Colo, her daughter Toni, grandson Mac, granddaughter Cassie and great-granddaughter Dotty.

Sadly, life for Western Lowland Gorillas in the wild is much different than Colo’s. Habitat loss, deforestation and the illegal bushmeat trade are constant threats for this critically endangered species. The Columbus Zoo helps protect Western Lowland Gorillas in the wild, supporting conservation efforts and distributing more than $1 million annually in conservation grants worldwide.


Columbus Zoo Tiger Cub Twins Update!

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As you might have read here on ZooBorns on July 11, that the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium in Ohio welcomed twin Amur Tiger cubs, both male. They were born on June 28 and 29. Both cubs have had their eyes open for about 10 days now, and have been taking advantage of their new sight to pad around. "It's impossible to get a picture of the two together because they won't sit still!" says a Zoo source.  

Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica), also historically referred to as Siberian tigers, are critically endangered; fewer than 500 individuals are believed to exist in the forests of the Russian Far East. Their populations are dwindling due to overhunting of prey species such as deer and wild boar, habitat loss, and poaching for skins and body parts used in traditional Chinese medicine. Humans directly cause 75 to 85 percent of tiger deaths.

Read more about what is being done to conserve this species after the jump.

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Photo Credit: G.Jones/Columbus Zoo and Aquarium

Continue reading "Columbus Zoo Tiger Cub Twins Update!" »


Columbus Zoo's New Stars Have Stripes!

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Ohio's Columbus Zoo and Aquarium have new stars... and they have stripes! Two male Amur Tiger cubs were born on June 28 and 29 to first-time-mom, Mara. They are the first ever born at this zoo -- the last birth of any tiger subspecies there occurred in 1990. 

Weighing just two to three pounds at birth, the newborns are currently in intensive care in the Animal Health Center. Their condition is not yet stable and it is unknown when visitors will be able to see them. The first arrived at 10:41 p.m. and the second about four hours later. The newborn cubs, weighing just two to three pounds at birth, were initially monitored by the animal care team using a remote feed from a camera mounted in the den.

The team was already concerned about the health of the first cub which, despite nursing successfully shortly after the birth of the second cub, had not nursed for an extended period and appeared to be weakening when the Zoo lost power on the evening of June 29 due to a storm. Since they were unable to monitor the activity in the den, the team made the decision to remove both cubs for hand rearing. The cubs are being raised together for companionship and socialization.

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Photo Credits: G. Jones, Columbus Zoo and Aquarium 

 


Fishing Cats Really Do Get Wet!

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We did a story on three little Fishing Cat kittens born on July 29 at the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium when they were only two weeks old. You can read about that and see the pictures HERE

Now they have gotten big enough to get into the water. That's right, Fishing cats like to get into the water to get their fish and that means they get wet, as can be seen in these photos. These cats have a long, stocky body, shorter legs and tail, and a broad head with round ears. Their olive-gray fur has black stripes and rows of black spots. They may use their flatened tail like a rudder when paddling around. 

Fishing Cats are medium-sizeded wild cats found in South and Southeast Asia. They were classified in 2008 by the IUCN as endangered, because the wetlands habitats in these areas are fast becoming degraded or settled. The Fishing Cat population has severely declined in the last decade alone.

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See more pics beneath the fold...

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Three Wee Kiwi - A First in North America

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A third Kiwi chick hatched at the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium on Jul. 17, marking the first time an institution in North America has successfully hatched three kiwi in one year. The Columbus Zoo’s first hatching of the North Island brown kiwi (Apteryx mantelli) occurred less than four months ago on March 23, while the second hatched on June 25, 2011.

This newest little chick, a female, is currently being cared for behind-the-scenes. The first two chicks are both males and have been given names reflecting their native New Zealand; “Ariki” (ah-ree-kee), meaning first-born or chie,f and “Toa” (to-ah) meaning warrior. The oldest of the chicks, Ariki, can be seen in the Zoo’s Roadhouse nocturnal habitat for a few hours each day.

Only seven kiwis, including the three at the Columbus Zoo, have hatched in the past five years in North America. The Columbus Zoo is only the third zoo in North America to successfully hatch a kiwi chick since the first one hatched at Smithsonian’s National Zoo in 1975. There are now six kiwis at the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium and a total of 22 kiwis in three United States zoos.

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Yello Kiwi 71- G. Jones, Columbus Zoo and Aquarium

Photo Credit: Grahm Jones/Columbus Zoo and Aquarium

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