Cockatoo

Get Your Fuzzy Here: Glossy Black Cockatoo Chick Hatches at Taronga

Cockatoo 5
The keepers at Australias' Taronga Conservation Society have proudly announced a very special new arrival, a Glossy Black Cockatoo chick. The chick hatched on the 25th of May, and initially only resembled a small ball of yellow fluff with one very large beak making it very cute looking indeed. 

First time mother Gloucester was hatched at Taronga in 2004 with the help of bird keepers as her mother had never raised a chick properly before. Poor Gloucester also fell ill 12 months ago, so has really come around to pair up, lay, incubate her own egg and now also be a great mum! 

Cockatoo_1 (1)

Cockatoo_4 (1)

Cockatoo_3

Cockatoo_2
Photo Credit: Taronga Conservation Society

At seven weeks of age the chick is doing very well and will be expected to fledge from its tree hollow in around three weeks time. This will be when visitors may glimpse Gloucester and her chick exploring their dense Bush bird aviary opposite the Koala Walkabout at the top of the zoo. 

It has been seven years since Taronga Zoo was last successful at hatching a Glossy Black Cockatoo -- Being both complex and specialised in their needs, there have been many challenges along the way. But they finally led to this very welcome event. 


Cockahoop About Rare Cockatoo Chicks

Cockatoo CU

After 19 years of trying,  Keepers at Chester Zoo in the UK have finally succeeded in the breeding of an extremely rare parrot. These three Philippine Cockatoo chicks are the first to be born at the zoo and are being hand-reared after recently hatching in incubators. The chicks, which look a bit like tiny dinosaurs, are now receiving round-the-clock care in their precious early days - and yes, they are nestled in a Walls ice cream tub!

Andy Woolham, Team Manager of Parrots and Penguins, said, “The species has a very aggressive nature and that makes successful breeding a very rare occurrence. That’s why this is incredibly significant for their conservation."

"We have been trying to persuade them to breed since the first birds arrived at the zoo in 1992, Woolham continued. "During this time there has been a program of dietary and environmental review, which has helped us to make changes to how we look after them and ultimately resulted in this success. It has been a long burning ambition of mine and I just can’t stop smiling! It is so important that a secure safety net population of this species is established in zoos.”

1Cockatoo

4Cockatoo

3Cockatoo_Kpr Karen Neech
Photo Credit: Chester Zoo

Also known as the Red Vented Cockatoo, the species is critically endangered in the wild due to a combination of illegal trapping for the pet trade and habitat loss.Chester Zoo supports conservation programs for the species in its natural home and works closely with organisations in the Philippines. These efforts have seen numbers increase over recent years but the species still remains under threat.


Denver Zoo Raises Palm Cockatoo Count by Two!

Denver Zoo Palm Cockatoo 1

Denver Zoo recently welcomed two Palm Cockatoos from two different breeding pairs. The chicks hatched on January 18 and February 10 and their genders are still unknown. Though the hatchlings will eventually be on display at the zoo's Nurture Trail exhibit, they are currently growing and developing under the watchful eye of bird keepers in the zoo's Bird Propagation Center. These are the second and third Palm Cockatoo chicks to be hatched at North American Zoos in the last year.

Denver Zoo Palm Cockatoo 2
Photo credits: Denver Zoo / Dave Parsons

Continue reading "Denver Zoo Raises Palm Cockatoo Count by Two!" »


First Palm Cockatoo in (almost) 40 Years!

Pal-Cockatoo-Adelaide-2

On October 5 an egg hatched at Adelaide Zoo in South Australia and out popped a Palm Cockatoo chick with a face that only a mother Palm Cockatoo could love! She has since grown into a gorgeous bird! This is the first successful Zoo birth of a Palm Cockatoo in Australia since 1973 and Adelaide Zoo is the only Zoo in Australia to house Palm Cockatoos.  Adelaide Zoo keepers decided to take the egg away from her parents as they had a poor history of incubating their own eggs.  The egg was then placed in an incubator and once hatched the chick was cared for by keepers.  For the first few weeks of her life she needed feeding every hour and a half.  This kept the keepers very busy who in turn took her home over night for those 2am feeds!  Since the Palm Cockatoo are native to warm regions such as northern Queensland, Australia, New Guinea island in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea, the chick had to be kept at a constant temperature of 35C/95F degrees during her early development.

Pal-Cockatoo-Adelaide-7

Pal-Cockatoo-Adelaide-5

Pal-Cockatoo-Adelaide-4

Pal-Cockatoo-Adelaide-3
Photo credits: Adelaide Zoo

Continue reading "First Palm Cockatoo in (almost) 40 Years!" »