Cincinnati Zoo

Meet Caspian, the Eurasian Eagle Owl

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The CIncinnati Zoo welcomed a Eurasian Eagle owl chick four weeks ago. Named Caspian, the young Owl could grow to have a wingspan on six feet from tip to tip! Wild Eurasian Eagle Owls are found across Europe, Asia and even in parts of Northern Africa. Their diet consists largely of small mammals, but full grown Eagle owls can prey on larger animals like foxes, and young deer. The Eurasian Eagle Owl (Bubo bubo) is one of the largest owl species in the world.

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Photo credits: Connie Lemperle


First Giraffe Birth for Cincinnati in 26 Years!

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Tessa, the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden’s four-year-old Maasai Giraffe gave birth to her first calf Saturday morning, April 2 at 9:40 a.m. in her indoor stall. This news is especially exciting considering that the last time the Zoo celebrated a Giraffe birth was nearly 26 years ago!  The Cincinnati Zoo’s history with Giraffe births actually dates back to 1889 when it became the first zoo in the Western Hemisphere to have a Giraffe born in captivity.

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Photo credits: Cincinnati Zoo

NOTE: The video below contains fascinating but graphic footage of the actual birth.

Continue reading "First Giraffe Birth for Cincinnati in 26 Years!" »


A Second Miracle at Connecticut's Beardsley Zoo

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The Connecticut’s Beardsley Zoo and Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden’s Lindner Center for Conservation & Research of Endangered Wildlife (CREW) are excited to announce the birth of the world’s first endangered cat produced by Oviductal Artificial Insemination (AI)!  Connecticut’s Beardsley Zoo’s veterinarian and a handful of other Zoo animal care specialists conducted their first physical examination of the Brazilian Ocelot kitten today, six weeks after its January 22 birth, and determined it’s a girl, weighing in at three pounds. This AI kitten is the second born to the mother, Kuma, who previously gave birth in 2008 to a healthy kitten conceived using the traditional AI method.  Kuma is the first Ocelot to have multiple pregnancies and kittens produced by AI. 

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Photo credits: 1st photo by Chris Eastland / 2nd - 6th photos by Shannon Calvert


Continue reading "A Second Miracle at Connecticut's Beardsley Zoo" »


Screaming Hairy Armadillo Babies!

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The Cincinnati Zoo recently welcomed three Screaming Hairy Armadillo babies, which will eventually join the Zoo's outreach program to teach school children about animals and conservation. As their name implies, the Screaming Hairy Armadillo squeals when threatened, perhaps by a hungry jaguar. Native to Arengtina, Bolivia, Chile and Paraguay this species ranges from deserts to grasslands and escapes the heat of the summer day deep within a burrow. 

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Photo and video credits: Cincinnati Zoo


It's Raining Little Penguins!

A bird in hand... baby penguin at the Cinncinnati Zoo

Apparently it's baby penguin season on ZooBorns with the latest adorable installment coming direct from the Cincinnati Zoo. This Little Penguin chick is just two-weeks old and is currently being cared for behind the scenes, inside the Zoo's Wings of Wonder exhibit.The chick weighs approximately 250 grams (or a quarter-pound), but is expected to weigh just over two pounds as an adult. Mom, “Oreo” (7-years-old) and dad, “Boomer” (8-years-old), were not properly incubating the egg, so staff at the Cincinnati Zoo made the decision to pull the egg and incubate it themselves. Little Penguins are the smallest species of penguin but that doesn't mean this chick doesn't like to eat. Zoo aviculture staff have to feed the demanding little bird six times a day, every three hours. At first it was fed a delicious fish milkshake but has since graduated to slices of fish (sashimi if you will).

Feed me! -  Baby penguin at the Cinncinnati Zoo

Baby penguin at the Cinncinnati Zoo

Don't miss this great video


Softly-Softly into the World...

Quiet, slow and shy, Pottos spend their days sleeping in nooks high up in the trees and nights hunting for tasty fruits, tree sap and the occasional sleepy bug. Only three North American zoos exhibit Pottos and only the Cincinnati Zoo has successfully bred this rarely seen primitive primate. In some parts of Africa, the Potto is called a "Softly-Softly," however when the diminutive Potto is threatened, they will jab at enemies with pointy vertebrae on the back of their necks. Distantly related to apes and humans, they are more closely related to other lorises. These photos come to us courtesy of and copyright by the Cincinnati Enquirer

Baby Potto Cincinnati Zoo hanging from a branch

Baby Potto Cincinnati Zoo hanging from a branch

Baby Potto Cincinnati Zoo hanging from a branch
Photo credits: The Enquirer / Ernest Coleman


Cincinnati's Newest Cougar Cubs

Two eight-week-old Cougar cubs are now on display in the Cincinnati Zoo nursery. Born September 17th, the brothers, named “Joseph” and “Tecumseh” will assist the Zoo in educating people about the need to protect these beautiful cats that once roamed throughout much of America. The brothers will soon join the Cat Ambassador Program in the future Night Hunters exhibit.

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Cougar cub cincinnati zoo 1aPhoto credits (two top photos): David Jenke

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Cougar cub cincinnati zoo 1aPhoto credits (two bottom photos): Connie Lemperie


Pulling for Cincinnati's Rare Rhino Calf

Nikki, the Cincinnati Zoo’s endangered Indian Rhino, gave birth early this morning to the world’s first live Indian Rhino calf produced by artificial insemination (AI). Nikki delivered a male calf at 6:06 a.m. in her indoor stall. Currently, the calf is in critical condition with Zoo staff working diligently to feed and stabilize him. Meanwhile, Nikki is doing well and will remain indoors. Nikki has been monitored 24 hours a day since the first of October.  She became increasingly restless throughout Monday evening into the night. Cincinnati Zoo Volunteer Observers called Zoo staff in early Tuesday morning. Nikki delivered her calf while volunteer and staff watched anxiously via a live video feed. As soon as the calf was born, Zoo staff jumped into action to assist and resuscitate the calf who was at first not breathing.  The calf has been successfully breathing on its own since.

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Photo credits: Cincinnati Zoo

Continue reading "Pulling for Cincinnati's Rare Rhino Calf" »


Raising a Little Wallaby

Meet the Cincinnati Zoo's newest little Parma Wallaby joey. This species of wallaby is the smallest in the genus Macropus, which includes all kangaroos, wallaroos and some wallabies. Extremely shy in the wild, Parma Wallabies were thought to be extinct until the mid 1960s, when a small hidden population was discovered in the swampy forests of Kawau Island off the coast of New Zealand.

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Living in the nursery for now, this baby wallaby will eventually become an outreach animal at the zoo.


Cincinnati's Yoda Baby

Well, he's really a White-Handed Gibbon. Photographer Paul Becker captured these shots last week while visiting the Cincinnati Zoo. The two-month-old Gibbon is named Possum. In the wild, White-Handed Gibbons (Lar Gibbons) are threatened by poaching for bushmeat and capture for the pet trade. The largest danger, however, is the loss of habitat in their native Southeast Asia. Incidentally, any experts out there know what species Yoda is, technically?

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Photo Credits: Paul Becker taken at Cincinnati Zoo