Cincinnati Zoo

It's a Boy! Birth of Sumatran Rhino Calf a Collaborative Conservation Success


The International Rhino Foundation (IRF) and the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden are pleased to announce the birth of a bouncing baby boy Sumatran rhino! The calf was born to mother, “Ratu”, a 12-year-old Sumatran rhino living at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Indonesia’s Way Kambas National Park and father, “Andalas,” born at the Cincinnati Zoo in 2001 and the first Sumatran Rhino calf born in captivity in 112 years.  In 2007 he was sent to the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary with hopes that he would eventually sire calves with one or more of the females at the Sanctuary. 

The baby was born on June 23 and weighs 60-70 pounds. He was attended by Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary veterinarians, Ratu’s keepers and advisors from the Cincinnati Zoo and Taronga Conservation Society Australia. Ratu gave birth after two hours of second-stage labor and several days of restlessness. The calf stood about an hour after birth and began nursing almost immediately. Ratu is a very good mother and the baby is healthy and active.

“To say that we are thrilled is an understatement,” said Dr. Terri Roth, Vice President of Conservation and Science and Director of the Cincinnati Zoo’s Lindner Center for Conservation and Research of Endangered Wildlife (CREW). “When we celebrated the monumental birth of Andalas at the Cincinnati Zoo in 2001, we never imagined he would play such a pivotal role in the survival of his species.  This international collaboration is conservation work at its finest.” Dr. Roth has been working in SE Asia for over a decade.

There are currently fewer than 200 Sumatran rhinos living in Indonesia and Malaysia. This is the first birth of a Sumatran rhino in an Indonesian facility and the first birth in an Asian facility in 124 years.



Photo Credit: International Rhino Foundation


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First Female Foal: A Baby Grevy's Zebra for Cincinnati Zoo


And her name is Savanna! On May 23, the first female Grevy's Zebra baby was born at Ohio's Cincinnati Zoo. Within the first 17 minutes of birth, she was standing and slowly began walking. She successfully nursed within the first hour and has spent the last few weeks bonding with her mom and getting to know the keepers behind the scenes. 

The name Savanna was suggested by Twitter follower @Fusion_AmyBaker and selected via vote by the zoo's Facebook fans, She's been going out in the zebra yard daily, and is curious, but is never far from mom, as seen in the video below.


Photo Credit: Cincinnatti Zoo


Cincinnati Welcomes Three Wee Fox Kits


In the wild, Bat-eared Foxes emerge from their den at dusk to prowl for prey. They tend to hang out near herds of Zebra, Buffalo, and other large mammals that attract insects.  Listening intently with its five-inch long ears, the Fox can detect a termite chewing grass or a beetle larva burrowing underground. Three Bat-eared Fox pups (2 females and 1 male) were born April 9 at Cincinnati Zoo to proud parents Runt and Pombre.



Photo credit: Connie Lemperle / Cincinnati Zoo

Emperor Scorpion Has 25 Babies at the Cincinnati Zoo!


The Emperor Scorpion, like the one pictured above, is the largest in the world. And this one has had 25 babies!  According to Thane Maynard from the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden, their new video of the scorpion and all those offspring is the "coolest thing you'll see all week."  

And it is indeed pretty cool, unless you are squeamish about seeing a giant arthropod walking around with 25 babies on her back! The Giant Emperor scorpion, from tropical Africa, is the largest scorpion in the world, and the Cincinnati Zoo is one of the few places that breed them.  

An interesting fact: If you see one at another Zoo or Museum, chances are good that they were born at the Cincinnati Zoo. A typical litter size is 25, so they have plenty to share with other institutions. The video below will show you the mother and all her little snow-white babies.

Babies CU
Photo Credit: Cincinnati Zoo

Baby Camel for Cincinnati Zoo - The First in Thirty Years


Saarai (pronounced “sorry”), the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden’s three-year-old Bactrian camel, gave birth to her first calf on Monday, April 23 and it's a boy. The last time the Zoo celebrated a camel birth was in 1983, so this birth was much anticipated by Zoo staff. 

Saarai became restless early Monday morning, and keepers noticed that she wasn’t eating or behaving as normal. As the afternoon approached, she began to pace and shortly thereafter keepers noticed the first signs of active labor. Staff blocked the outdoor exhibit off to the public and Saarai delivered the calf at 3:15 p.m. while the father, three-year-old Humphrey, watched from the neighboring exhibit. Soon after delivery, Saarai began nuzzling her calf; the baby first attempted to stand around 4 p.m. Mom and calf are doing well and will remain off exhibit, spending time nursing and bonding. 

The Zoo is asking for help in naming the baby. Keepers have selected their top three choices (Henry, Lyn and Cain), and the public can vote for their favorite online through Monday, April 30. The winning name will be announced on May 1.

Mom and

Photo Credit: Cincinnati Zoo 

Meet Jasper The Baby Barn Owl


A five-week-old barn owl, named “Jasper,” born on February 16, is being hand raised for the Cincinnati Zoo's outreach program. Jasper came to Cincinnati from the World Bird Sanctuary in Saint Louis, MO. He is spending quality time getting acquainted with Zoo staff because his days will soon include interacting with school children, greeting visitors at the Zoo, and traveling to schools throughout the Tri-state, as an official Zoo Outreach Animal.




Look Who's Hogging All the Attention!


Four 4-week-old, Hedgehogs are currently hogging all of the attention at the Cincinnati Zoo.  The four incredibly cute Hedgehogs were born to mother, “Mali” and father, “Kenya,” and are currently off exhibit, behind the scenes in the Zoo’s Children’s Zoo Nursery.

Two male and two female, the siblings were born on February 4 and are being hand-raised by the Nursery keepers until they are old enough to be included in the Zoo’s Animal Outreach Program.  The babies are spending time getting acquainted with Zoo staff because their days will soon include interacting with school children, greeting visitors at the Zoo,  and traveling to schools throughout the Tri-state, as an official Zoo Outreach Animal.  

Photo credits: Cincinnati Zoo


Nursery keepers are feeding the babies four times a day by grinding up dry Hedgehog food and mixing it with esbilac. The gruel is easy for the young Hedgehogs to digest.   The Cincinnati Zoo has been home to 13 Hedgehogs. Did you know baby Hedgehogs are born blind and hairless!? They don’t begin to sprout their sharp spines until 36 hours after birth.  The spines form a protective covering over their body.

Meet Shane, Cincinnati Zoo's Baby African Pygmy Hedgehog!


Shane, the baby African Pygmy Hedgehog, is about one quarter of his adult size in these recent photos. In the wild these hedgehogs are incectivores, dining on worms and grubs, but in Zoos, they typically are fed kibble, closer to what a pet dog or cat may eat. Shane will be part of Cincinnati Zoo's Outreach Program, which introduces school students and zoo visitors to varied kinds of exotic animals.


First Ever Birth of Pallas' Kittens with the Help of Advanced Science


Three healthy Pallas’ Cat kittens (two males and one female) were born on June 8th, 2011 at the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden following a laparoscopic oviductal artificial insemination (AI) procedure conducted by scientists from the Cincinnati Zoo’s Center for Conservation and Research of Endangered Wildlife (CREW).  This pregnancy and birth are the first ever in Pallas’ Cats from artificial insemination.


Photo credits: Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Gardens

The AI procedure was performed using laparoscopy or minimally invasive surgery combined with a new oviductal insemination technique for cats that was developed at CREW.  The Zoo’s female Pallas’ Cat, Sophia, was treated with two hormones to stimulate ovarian follicle growth and ovulation and then was inseminated in both oviducts with semen collected from the Zoo’s male Pallas’ Cat, Buster.  Three healthy kittens were born following a 69 day gestation.  The kittens, now 9 weeks of age, are being raised by their mother in an off-exhibit enclosure.

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