Sixteen Little Webbed Feet! Capybara Babies Born At Brevard Zoo


On August 2, Brevard Zoo’s Capybara, Bailey, gave birth to a litter of four pups. This is the first Capybara litter born at the Zoo in more than 10 years. Their genders have not yet been confirmed. The entire Capybara family, including first-time parents Bailey and Clancy, can be seen on exhibit in the La Selva loop daily.

Capybaras are the largest rodents in the world, related to chinchillas and guinea pigs. Its common name means "Master of the Grasses”. They are social, semi-aquatic mammals that live in groups found throughout South America, including Panama, Colombia, Venezuela, Brazil, Argentina, French Guyana, Uruguay, Peru, and Paraguay. Capybaras live in densely forested areas near bodies of water, such as lakes, rivers, swamps, ponds and marshes, flooded savanna, and along rivers in tropical forest. They are very vocal animals and communicate through a combination of scent and sound, including purrs, barks, whistles, squeals and grunts. Baby Capybara are typically weaned at about 16 weeks, but can be found nibbling grasses as early as one week after birth.



Photo Credits: Brevard Zoo 

Twice as Nice! Capybara Twins Born at Belfast Zoo


Belfast Zoo is celebrating the arrival of two of the world’s largest rodents, in the form of twin capybara babies. They've been named Gus and Jacques. Parents Charlie (with the twins in the bottom picture), and Lola, posing just below with Gus, welcomed their offspring who came into the world on April 3.

Capybaras originate from South America. The scientific name for capybara (Hydrochoerus) means ‘water hog’ and although they are technically from the rodent family, this name relates to the fact that capybaras are semi-aquatic animals and love the water. In fact, capybaras have webbed feet and can stay underwater for up to five minutes at a time, to hide from predators.

Zoo Manager, Mark Challis, said, “Our capybaras live in a mixed South American exhibit in the zoo.  Already in 2012, we have welcomed Kara and Pancho, the giant anteaters, to this enclosure and now we are celebrating the arrival of our capybara twins! It’s definitely an exciting time and I am sure that zoo visitors will enjoy visiting Gus and Jacques.”


Twins and dad

Photo Credit: Belfast Zoo 

Triple Play! Capybara Babies at Twycross Zoo


A trio of Capybara babies were born at Twycross Zoo this month and they are out in the sunshine, exploring their habitat. Capybara usually only breed once a year, and have a gestation period of 5 months, giving birth to up to 8 young. The babies are born weighing just about 2 pounds (.91 kgs).

The Capybara can be found in several types of social groupings, ranging from simple male-female pairings, to parents and young to larger mixed groups, with one male that is dominant over all the females in that group. Here the little ones mix easily with the adults, but look pretty small in comparison!

The babies nostrils, eyes and ears are all positioned on top of its head because they will spend a lot of time in the water -- and in the wild, they'd need to look out for predators while swimming. Their webbed toes will help them become both excellent swimmers and divers. Their diet is based on water based vegetation and grasses. Water plants, young buds and soft tree bark are eaten in the day and fresh grass in the evening.

The range of the Capybara covers much of South America east of the Andes down to south Uruguay where they inhabit densely vegetated areas around ponds, lakes, rivers, marshes and swamps.




Photo Credit: Twycross Zoo



One Day Old Capybara Trots Out to Say Hello


This single capybara baby made its public debut yesterday at the San Diego Zoo in California. At only one day old, this little baby weighs 3 - 5 pounds (1.36-2.27 kgs) and has teeth that let it nibble on grasses!

In fact, the word capybara means "master of the grass" and its scientific name, Hydrochoerus, means "water hog" because of its love for water. The capybara, however, is not a pig as that implies, but the world's largest rodent species. An adult male can weigh up to 141 pounds and a female up to 146 pounds! and end up to be about two feet tall.

Capybara are highly social and live in groups controlled by a dominant male. Capybara females in a group are known to help care for and even nurse each other's young. This is the second capybara born in the past week and at this time, its gender is unknown.

Capybara are found in Panama, Colombia, Venezuela, the Guyanas and Peru, south through Brazil, Paraguay, northeast Argentina, and Uruguay. Semi-aquatic, they frequent dense vegetation surrounding lakes, rivers, swamps, marshes, and ponds.


Baby mom
Photo Credits: Sand Diego Zoo

Happy Capy Babies Explore Howletts Wild Animal Park

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Keepers at Howletts Wild Animal Park near Canterbury, England were pleased to introduce a new litter of Capybara pups to the park recently. “Capybaras are the largest of the rodent species and have big bodies with short heads and shorter front legs than back legs. Their feet are slightly webbed with 4 toes on the front and 3 toes on the back feet. When they dive they can remain under water for up to 5 minutes!” Said Keeper Joel Bunce.

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Howletts Wild Animal Park has a group of six Capybara; five female and one male. The group has three breeding females and litters are normally weaned around 16 weeks. Joel said: “These lovely animals are great to look after, the pups are so curious at the moment and at feeding time make the funniest noises as they jumble over each other for the food.” Capybaras are not endangered in the wild although their numbers are declining in some areas due to hunting. Their natural predators are large constrictors.

World's Largest Rodent Born at San Diego Zoo!


The San Diego Zoo welcomed a new Capybara on March 7. The baby was born to a first-time mother, Rose, and could be seen running around the exhibit just hours after it was born. Rose is taking great care of her offspring, which nurses several times a day. Animal care staff expects nursing to continue for another 15 weeks. In addition to nursing, the baby has already started eating solid foods, including broccoli and apple. Capybaras are born with incisor teeth and keepers have seen the baby chewing on branches and trees around the exhibit.

Photo credits: Ken Bohn

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World’s Largest Rodent Born at Paignton Zoo

On August 18th, the UK's Paignton Zoo welcomed a baby Capybara to parents David and Davina. Sometimes called a the Giant Guinea Pig, these massive rodents can grow four feet long (a rodent of unusual size perhaps?). Capybaras love to lounge, and even sleep, in swamps and rivers with only their eyes and nostrils poking out.

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Baby capybara Paignton Zoo 1

Baby capybara Paignton Zoo 1

Family portrait

Baby capybara Paignton Zoo 1

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Capy Trio Rocks Chessington Zoo

These 15-day-old Capybara babies seem like they were born to rock.  Something about the spikey-haired "wet" look and their "blue steel" attitude should land them a cover spot on Rolling Stone. "Spinal Cap", perhaps? The pictures were taken at Chessington Zoo in the UK just yesterday by photographer Mogodonman. Note the sleepy-eyed bass player on the top left of the lead image.




More pics after the jump...

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Akron Zoo Announces Two Capybara Births

The Akron Zoo is thrilled to announce the birth on March 24, 2010 of two capybara babies. Mother capy', Courtney, and the two babies are now on exhibit in the Zoo’s Legends of the Wild. The capybaras will be on exhibit daily as long as the temperature is above 65 degrees and conditions are favorable. The capybara's scientific name hydrochaeris is Greek for "Water Hog" and they live up to it!



Submarine Capy!

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All Aboard the Capybara Train

The Santa Barbara Zoo's four new 4-month-old capybaras are now out on exhibit near the courtyard as of Tuesday, March 2, 2010. This adorable litter, consisting of 3 males and 1 female, came to the Santa Barbara Zoo from the Alameda Park Zoo in New Mexico. Capybaras are the world's largest rodent from Central and South America, and can grow up to 4 feet long and 100-150 pounds! Nicknamed "swamp hogs," capybaras are dependent on water and well adapted to it - they even have webbed feet. Capybaras swim and dive freely and can stay submerged underwater for up to five minutes. They also wallow in water to protect skin from hot sun. Like all rodents, capybaras must chew and gnaw to wear down continually growing teeth. They tend to live in groups of about 20 adults.