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October 2011
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November 2011

Paignton Zoo's "Royal" Family Grows: Cherry-Crowned Mangabey Born

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A Cherry-crowned Mangabey has been born at Paignton Zoo. On October 21, mother Kibibi and father Yengo welcomed the little male, who has yet to be named. The arrival brings the Zoo’s troop up to six - two males and four females. 

Head Keeper Andrew Fry said: “It’s a family group - mom, dad, sister, granny, aunty and baby. This is the second time they have bred with us - his older sister was born here last summer.”

Andy added: “This is one of my favourite species to work with. They are great fun but they can be very challenging. They have an inquisitive nature and great strength - they like to test things to destruction! We can’t, for example, given them the big plastic buoys that we sometimes give to other animals to play with, as they can shred them with their large canines. They enjoy food-based and sensory enrichment – cardboard tubes and paper sacks with scents on them.”

Named for the patch of red hair on their heads, Cherry-crowned mangabeys (Cercocebus torquatus) are African forest monkeys. Their range includes the Omo Forest in Nigeria where Paignton Zoo funds environmental education work.

The species is classified as Vulnerable by the IUCN Red List, mainly due to habitat destruction and the bush meat trade. The Zoo’s troop can be found in the Monkey Heights complex.

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Photo Credit: Ray Wiltshire

 

 


Wobbly Little Langur Monkey Steps Outside With Mom

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There’s a bright new addition at ZSL London Zoo – a neon orange baby monkey. And Zooborns first introduced you to the baby HERE.

Keepers at the Zoo were delighted when first-time mum Lu Lu, a rare Francois Langur, gave birth to the flame-haired baby in early September. Baby Tango's hair will gradually become black like Mom and Dad's when the baby is about six months old. In the mean time, it makes the baby even easier to see when out in their habitat.

Francois Langurs are one of the world’s rarest monkeys, and originate from northeast Vietnam and China. Classed as critically endangered, their populations are declining rapidly because of habitat loss.

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Photo Credit: ZSL London Zoo


Busch Gardens Baby Boom!

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Busch Gardens’ newest addition, a female Cape Buffalo, was born to mother Semara on Sept. 21. Cape Buffalos are extremely social; members of the same group will stay in direct contact with each other and will often sleep with their heads resting on one another. At the time of his birth, the calf weighed approximately 45 lbs. The playful and explorative youngster now weights 75 lbs. Once full grown, Cape Buffalos can weigh up to 2,000 lbs.

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Two days earlier, the park’s Sable Antelope herd welcomed the third new baby of the month, a female who took her first steps within a few minutes of birth. Though Sable Antelopes are shaky at first, newborns can run fast enough to keep up with the herd within 3-5 days.


Photo and video credits: Matt Marriott/Busch Gardens Tampa Bay

Busch Gardens’ guests can view all of the new babies from Rhino Rally, the Skyride or Serengeti Express train ride. For an even closer look, the Serengeti Safari offers guests and open-bed truck tour of the 65-acre Serengeti Plain, with opportunities to get up-close to antelope and rhinos and hand-feed giraffes.


A Lucky Number: 17 Critically Endangered Iguana Hatchlings

Utila Island iguanas by Adam Davis

A critically endangered species of Iguana has bred at Bristol Zoo Gardens for the very first time. Reptile keepers at Bristol Zoo successfully hatched 17 baby Utila spiny-tailed Iguanas – a species that is listed as critically endangered and once considered to be one of the rarest Iguanas in existence.

The eggs were laid after two young adult Iguanas arrived at the zoo last year as a new breeding pair, to boost numbers of this species in captivity. They were transferred to a temperature-controlled incubator for three months until hatching and then moved into a vivarium on display in the Zoo’s Reptile House.

Tim Skelton, Curator of reptiles and amphibians at Bristol Zoo, said: “I’m thrilled that we have successfully hatched so many Iguanas from the first clutch of eggs laid by our new female. This is an interesting and very valuable species because they are only found on one island, Utila, off the coast of Honduras in Central America.”

He added: “The babies are currently only around 15cm long but will eventually grow to approximately 60cm on a diet of vegetation and small insects.”

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Photo Credit: Adam Davis

Continue reading "A Lucky Number: 17 Critically Endangered Iguana Hatchlings" »


Brazilian Tapir Baby Named In Memory Of His Dad

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A Brazilian Tapir baby named Little Ron, at only 9 days old, is now out and about in his paddock at Marwell Wildlife.  Born with a very pretty coat of pale spots and stripes on a reddish brown background, he is delighting visitors with his striking appearance. When he is about a year old he will lose his markings and develop a beautiful light brown color, just like his mom Summer and sister Quito. He's named ‘Little Ron’ in memory of his Dad, Ronaldo, who sadly died at the park last month after an acute illness.

Section Manager David White said: “Staff miss Ronaldo greatly and he was a popular character amongst visitors to the park- so we thought it would be nice to carry on his memory by calling the baby Little Ron.

“Summer is coping well and has had some assistance from Quito, her previous offspring. She is very attentive and protective of him, always keeping a look out and calling him when he is out of view, although this all changes when food is about!!”

 “Quito was very interested in the birth and almost acted like a birthing companion for her mom. She has been helping to keep him occupied and is keeping a watchful eye over him.”

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Photo Credit: Marwell Wildlife

Continue reading "Brazilian Tapir Baby Named In Memory Of His Dad" »


"ZooBorns CATS!", The New Book, Hits Shelves Today!

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From the guys who brought you the smash hit ZooBorns: The Newest, Cutest Animals from the World's Zoos and Aquariums, which DiscoverMagazine.com called “hands down the cutest books ever to grace my shelf” comes ZooBorns CATS! The Newest, Cutest Kittens and Cubs from the World's Zoos featuring adorable pictures of newborn felines from accredited zoos and conservation programs around the world. ZooBorns: Cats! is the largest and most complete collection of kittens of different feline species ever published! Every sale of ZooBorns CATS! supports the Association of Zoos and Aquariums Conservation Endowment Fund. "CATS!" hits the shelves of local bookstores today, and you can order it now at Amazon and Barnes & Noble. Look out for exclusive giveaways and excerpts on our Facebook page in the coming weeks!

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Above: One of over 130 outstanding baby cat pictures from ZooBorns CATS!, this photograph by Life On White shows Chapu, one of Zoo Madrid's endangered Persian Leopard cubs.


Longest Pregnancy Recorded, Smallest Baby Elephant Too!

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A baby elephant was born after the longest pregnancy recorded at ZSL Whipsnade Zoo... and, to make matters more interesting, he is also the smallest baby ever recorded there.

After a whopping 700-day pregnancy, the newest addition to the zoo's Asian elephant herd was born at 12:15am on October 18. This is the third baby for experienced mum Azizah. The normal gestation period for an Asian elephant is 22 months but the new calf stayed put for nearly two years.

Despite this, the new calf, who has yet to be named, weighed in at just 228 pounds (104kg) at birth. Keepers were initially worried the pint-sized pachyderm would not be tall enough to reach his mum’s milk, but he quickly learnt to get on his tip-toes and has had no problem feeding.

Elephant keeper Lee Sambrook said: “Azizah took to him straightaway and the rest of the herd are so excited to be around the baby and touch it. Elephants are social animals and having youngsters joining the herd is what elephant life is about.”

The baby is venturing out of the elephant barn with the rest of the herd on warmer days, where visitors can see him outside in the paddock playing with his siblings and suckling his mum.

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Azizah and calf

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Photo Credit: ZSL Whipsnade Zoo